New York Draft Riots

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New York Draft Riots

anticonscription feelings resulted in anarchy and bloodshed (1863). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 429]
See: Riot
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76) Lause contends that many contemporary historians have made similar mistakes in their treatment of the New York City draft riots, which have typically been attributed to the explosion of resentments harboured by foreign-born workers.
2) The mob was part of several days of explosive violence that came to be known as the New York City Draft Riots.
Two very good accounts of the riots are Adrian Cook's The Armies of the Streets (Lexington: UP of Kentucky, 1974) and Iver Bernstein's The New York City Draft Riots (New York: Oxford UP, 1990).
The New York City Draft Riots: Their significance for American Society and Politics in the Age of the Civil War tells the story of the New York City draft riots, following their participants and their underlying importance to the overall social concerns of the times.
closely studies evidence of Roman Catholic Church complicity in the plot to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln, as well as damning evidence of the church's involvement in the devastating New York City Draft Riots during the civil war-a shameful rampage of murder, lynching and arson perpetuated primarily by Irish Catholics.
Yet, the northern public met Congress's conscription act with widespread disapproval, culminating in the weeklong New York City draft riots of July 1863.
Chapter three revisits the class composition of the Urban League; Neely primarily challenges Iver Bernstein's New York City Draft Riots depiction of the League as primarily an elitist entity, arguing a middle-class presence existed within the Republican affiliation.
The most brutal case of race-based violence directed at interracial couples occurred during the 1863 New York City Draft Riots.
During the New York City Draft Riots the city's own inhabitants unleashed a torrent of violence and destruction that chiefly targeted African Americans.
They were needed not to battle more Confederates but to put down the most violent civil insurrection in American history: the New York City draft riots.
The New York City draft riots began on July 13, nine days after the battle of Gettysburg.
The most damning evaluation of Wool's leadership was presented by historian Adrian Cook in The Armies of the Streets: The New York City Draft Riots of 1863.

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