New Zealand Flax


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New Zealand Flax

 

(Phormium tenax), a perennial herb of the Liliaceae family, sometimes classified in the Agavaceae family. It has sword-shaped leaves up to three m long arranged in two rows on a short stem. The branched blossom cluster, 1.5–4.5 m high, bears 250–460 red or yellow flowers, which are pollinated by birds. The fruit is a three-faceted pod. The leaves contain a strong fiber used for making twine, rope, ship rigging, and matting. New Zealand flax is native to New Zealand and Norfolk Island, where it grows in large thickets on moist plains and mountain slopes. It can withstand temperatures of –10°C. The plant is raised for both industrial and decorative purposes in many subtropical countries. In the Caucasus, along the Black Sea, New Zealand flax is grown in gardens and parks and on small plantations.

References in periodicals archive ?
Other ones you might include in your Ch i golden border would be Choisya ternata 'Sundance' or yellow variegated cordylines and New Zealand Flax can make a splash.
Chartreuse New Zealand flax and smoke tree (Cotinus 'Golden Spirit') add a yellow glow at either end, while pink-flowered rock-rose 'Victor Reiter' and wispy restio (Cannomois virgata) soften the other plants' spiky forms.
OTHERWISE known as New Zealand flax, these can give your garden a really dramatic twist and stay looking fabulous through the long, dry summer days when the majority of herbaceous perennials are flagging.
You'll need eight New Zealand flax leaves for each star, cutting four leaves to around 18cm in length and four slightly shorter.
In recent years the New Zealand flax, Phormium, has become very popular, with its strong, vertical strap-shaped leaves that give height and structure to the garden.
What the Aussies and the Kiwis once saw as little more than weeds - those marvellous tree ferns (Dicksonia antartica and Cyathea australis), the grass trees, the New Zealand flax (phormiums) and bottle brushes (callistemons) - and dumped on the tip with the rest of the week's garden refuse, we are importing in increasing quantities.
Both library gardens include New Zealand flax (Phormium) as a foundation plant.
Foliage plants such as New Zealand flax are immensely useful and astelia make great alternatives.
Plants include the cordyline australis and the hardy phormium, or New Zealand flax, which is very tolerant to wind and salt from the sea.
For even more tropical taste, try New Zealand flax (Phormium), particularly the cultivars with their coloured
At first, I thought about suggesting a strong accent plant like Phormium tenax, the new Zealand flax, with strong sword-shaped leaves to five feet.
PHORMIUM OTHERWISE known as New Zealand flax, these can give your garden a really dramatic twist and stay looking fabulous through the long, dry summer days when the majority of herbaceous perennials are flagging.

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