neologism

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neologism

A new word or new meaning for an existing word. The high-tech field routinely creates new meanings for words. Before 1980, there was no doubt that a "mouse" referred only to a furry rodent.
References in periodicals archive ?
6,500 new words have been added to the Collins Scrabble word list
Despite the hundreds of thousands of words already defined in the dictionary so far, Michael says he is always on the look out for new words or older ones that have somehow missed out being included in the past.
In a fifth-grade class, the teacher asks students to guess what a new word means; the teacher then gives the students the formal definition.
The authors have explained that many of the new words are connected to new administrative events or professional activities, like monitoring, bodyguard, dealer, supervisor, distributor, auditor, image maker.
So many of these new words show the impact of online connectivity to our lives and livelihoods," explains Peter Sokolowski, Editor at Large for Merriam-Webster.
Lead author Brock Ferguson, a doctoral candidate in psychology at Northwestern, said that after overhearing this new word in conversation, infants who hear a helpful sentence such as 'the blick is eating' should look more towards the animal than the other, non-living object.
Over the course of a week, one group heard three different stories with the same new words.
We expect hundreds if not thousands of new words to be suggested along with the words already on the exchange.
In looking back to September 11th, we can look forward and back with a new word lot a very new and very old Theology of Terror.
The purpose of the meeting was to come to an agreement on the design of the new Word Trade Center, which will be called the Freedom Towers.
When the researchers constructed a family tree that includes modern dogs and wolves, they found that the ancient New Word dogs were much closer to Old World dogs than to New Word wolves.
The leader abandons his flock of origin to spread the new word (Hibiscus flees his original commune for being too strict).