Newgate Calendar

Newgate Calendar

popular volumes on notorious crimes, published from 1773 to 1826. [Br. Lit.: Barnhart, 810]
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It was the ghastly popular record of Criminal Trials in England, called the Newgate Calendar.
He turned to the side-table, and, producing the volumes of the Newgate Calendar, gave one to his brother.
I also felt that I had committed every crime in the Newgate Calendar.
I have frequently found it necessary to reflect, for my own self-support, that I really had not done anything to bring myself into the Newgate Calendar, but only wanted to effect a great saving and a great improvement.
A very good name for the Newgate Calendar,' said Mr.
The Newgate Calendar records the ways in which criminal prosecution led to the delegitimization of a spectrum of sex/gender roles; moreover, it serves as a site for the inscription of class- and gender-based ideologies of sexuality.
It is not her body's illegibility that the Newgate Calendar documents but the threat that this illegibility posed to other women's sexualities and on the emergent codes of marriage.
But even though the Newgate Calendar refers to her as a shameful "monopoliser of her own sex," the court could only call her "an uncommon, notorious cheat" because of the limitations of the terminology then available to inscribe and penalize sex, gender, and sexuality.
Subsequent works, such as The Malefactor's Register of 1799, and The Criminal Recorder of 1804, in turn cannibalised the original Newgate Calendar.
There is, however, no single work which may simply be called the Newgate Calendar, for there is George Theodore Wilkinson's The Newgate Calendar Improved, of 1816, William Jackson's The New and Complete Newgate Calendar, or, Malefactors' Universal Register, and The Newgate Calendar, edited by Andrew Knapp and William Baldwin, in four volumes, published between 1824 and 1828.
showed that there is a very broad distinction between this in Barrington's account and mere Newgate calendar reports.
The Newgate Calendar records that the Court of Archers once attempted to punish Moll for having worn male clothing by causing her to stand dressed only in a white sheet in front of St.