NIC

(redirected from Newly industrialized countries)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Financial, Acronyms.
Related to Newly industrialized countries: Developing countries

NIC

(networking)

NIC

(hardware)

NIC

Abbr. for “not in the contract.”

noise isolation class (NIC)

A single-number rating derived from measured values of noise reduction between two enclosed spaces that are connected by one or more paths.

NIC

(1) (Network Interface Card) See network adapter. See also InterNIC.

(2) (New Internet Computer) An earlier Linux-based computer from The New Internet Computer Company (NICC), Palo Alto, CA. The NIC was a pure Web appliance without disk drives, and the OS, Java Virtual Machine and browser all resided on a CD-ROM. An Internet storage service was required to save files, but bookmarks were saved in flash memory. For e-mail, a Web-based service was required. Co-founded in 2000 by Oracle magnate Larry Ellison, the NIC was a new incarnation of the network computer, but it never caught on. See network computer and Internet appliance.


The NIC
The Linux-based New Internet Computer was a pure Web appliance introduced in 2000 at USD $199 sans monitor. Without drives, files had to be stored on an Internet storage service. (Image courtesy of The New Internet Computer Company.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The results suggest that industrialized, newly industrialized, and developing countries did not significantly differ in their relative emphasis on internal or external stakeholders, although there was a marginally significant tendency for articles on newly industrialized countries to focus on internal stakeholders ([?
In contrast, imports from China surged 25 percent, and imports from the newly industrialized countries in Asia rose 13 percent.
Overseas, sales at the Omron Group's bases in China and elsewhere in Asia grew strongly, reflecting increased demand for new cars due to the motorization of markets in newly industrialized countries.
Many of the products in the telecommunication index are imported from newly industrialized countries whose currencies have not appreciated against the dollar.
By area, exports to Japan and to the newly industrialized countries in Asia increased substantially, and exports to Canada and to Western Europe rose by smaller amounts.
This report includes detailed data on the sources and components comprising wealth management technology spending in Developed and Newly Industrialized countries in APAC.
Sales of high-technology products, such as computers and semiconductors, bolstered exports, especially to Latin America, China, and the newly industrialized countries in Asia.
Judging from the pattern of sales by destination in 1990, a large share of the spending in Japan is probably to service the domestic market (83 percent of sales by Japanese affiliates were local), whereas the spending in the newly industrialized countries is probably to service both domestic and export markets (for the four countries combined, 27 percent of sales were to local markets, 45 percent were to the United States, and 28 percent were to other foreign countries).
In the third quarter, the dollar depreciated 7 percent on a trade-weighted quarterly average basis against the currencies of 10 industrial countries and 4 percent against the currencies of 22 OECD countries and 4 newly industrialized countries in the Far East (table B, chart 1).
Finally, the rating is based on the banking environment in Chile, which is less risky than that of all other Latin American countries and broadly comparable to newly industrialized countries in Asia and certain continental European systems, but subject to increasing competition.
From the end of March to the end of June, the dollar depreciated 5 percent on a trade-weighted basis against the currencies of 10 industrial countries and 4 percent against the combined currencies of 22 OECD countries and 4 newly industrialized countries in the Far East, returning to the same levels as at the end of December against most currencies (table B, chart 1).
4 billion, and dollar assets of other countries, including the newly industrialized countries in the Far East, decreased $3.