Newman


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Related to Newman: John Henry Newman, Cardinal Newman, John Newman

Newman

1. Barnet. 1905--70, US painter, a founder of Abstract Expressionism: his paintings include the series Stations of the Cross (1965--66)
2. John Henry. 1801--90, British theologian and writer. Originally an Anglican minister, he was a prominent figure in the Oxford Movement. He became a Roman Catholic (1845) and a priest (1847) and was made a cardinal (1879). His writings include the spiritual autobiography, Apologia pro vita sua (1864), a treatise on the nature of belief, The Grammar of Assent (1870), and hymns
3. Paul. born 1925, US film actor and director, who appeared in such films as Hud (1963), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), The Sting (1973), The Verdict (1982), The Colour of Money (1986), Nobody's Fool (1994), and Road to Perdition (2002)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Essay on Development, written during this long examination, Newman had analyzed how the myriad changes in Catholic theology and life could possibly fit with a notion of a deposit of faith delivered completely during the age of the apostles.
Newman shocked the early music world with his 1967 debut album, Anthony Newman Plays JS Bach on Columbia Records.
Newman continues to develop and improve its campus and facilities for students.
The same themes Newman analyzes in the former, he dramatizes through history in the latter.
When Newman would preach at the University Parish of St.
It is these qualities which enables Newman to have one of the best graduate employment rates of UK universities, 93 per cent last year.
That favoritism also explains why Newman was a far more sympathetic reader of Origen than one might expect.
Those who have met, spoken to, befriended or played field hockey with Newman should consider themselves the lucky ones.
Newman wasn't just hawking product--he never even wanted his picture on the label--he was fundraising.
As war clouds formed in the 1930s, Newman encouraged all to visit the war's cemeteries, going so far as to suggest that if the world's leaders met in them rather than grand palaces they would not "talk so airily about the next war.
The central thesis of the Apologia, like that of Newman's autobiographical novel Loss and Gain, is that "it is impossible to stop the growth of the mind" (1); the independence of Newman s thought--particularly his pre-conversion freedom from Catholic influence--is repeatedly presented as evidence of the authenticity of his mental development.