Newspeak


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Related to Newspeak: doublethink

Newspeak

A language inspired by Scratchpad.

[J.K. Foderaro. "The Design of a Language for Algebraic Computation", Ph.D. Thesis, UC Berkeley, 1983].

newspeak

official speech of Oceania; language of contradictions. [Br. Lit.: 1984]
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References in periodicals archive ?
They won't need to in future, because the government intends to formally legalize the practice, or in the committee's Newspeak, make the process more "transparent.
We cannot allow the political Newspeak of our age to essentially brainwash us into pacifist complacency.
By contrast, imagine a BBC presenter referring skeptically to the government's claim of a 'peace enforcement operation' for the West's invasion of Afghanistan, Iraq, or Libya and describing such language as 'the kind of newspeak that would make George Orwell proud.
This long disconnect between official Newspeak and the reality of reform raises the issue of the role of ideas, if any.
Another example of Newspeak is when members of the civic elite serve as representatives for the people, I, on behalf of Chinese farmers/workers/university students/etc.
Newspeak, Eurospeak, and the legitimacy of redefinition
The logic for terminating something that worked so well is a fine example of governmental newspeak and trepidation.
The Pentagon itself, via Gates, remains on the offensive--threatening Iran with an explicit "all options on the table", that is, nuclear attack included; and Obama, in an Orwellian newspeak masterpiece twist, has added that the US will "sustain our nuclear deterrent" as an "incentive" to both Iran and North Korea.
Everything lies in language, and that was Orwell's great obsession, which cannot just be reduced to the Newspeak of Nineteen Eighty-Four.
17) The Orwellian newspeak in this interpretation becomes the recycling and mixing of phenomena: "[the artists] hand-make the virtual, cite history in fugue fervour and find the poetic and enduring in the cacophony of pop cultural din" (Ellis, 4).
At the end of the series, he will choose one artist's work to display in his exhibition, Newspeak - British Art Now, at the Hermitage Gallery in St Petersburg, and has also arranged for them to receive their own studio space for three years.
Meanwhile, the text pushes on--sometimes in hypnotic incantations, sometimes in technocratic newspeak (the title itself, USER GROUP DISCO, brilliantly conjures both abstracted, computer-based collective identities and real, pulsing, dancing bodies)--mimicking the disembodied voices which artists such as Kruger began ventriloquizing in the 1980s and which Price now manipulates by the dozen.