Newspeak


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Related to Newspeak: doublethink

Newspeak

A language inspired by Scratchpad.

[J.K. Foderaro. "The Design of a Language for Algebraic Computation", Ph.D. Thesis, UC Berkeley, 1983].
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newspeak

official speech of Oceania; language of contradictions. [Br. Lit.: 1984]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
One of the features of the world of Oceania reflecting Orwell's prescience is its official language, Newspeak, an argot resembling a kind of Morse code that satirizes advertising norms, political jargon, and government bureaucratese.
For example, Newspeak is an ideological language structure that diminishes knowledge to reduce the agency of a certain segment of the population.
In his opening address to the federation's biennial conference, he said: "Police statistics have become something of a newspeak for the way in which we quantify success.
A world in which the rulers even invented a new language, Newspeak, in order to distort the true meaning of words and suppress dissent.
The novel, which gave the English language expressions such as 'Big Brother' 'doublethink' and 'newspeak', has now inspired the single malt, Jura 1984 Vintage, which has been quietly maturing for the past 30 years.
The attempt to neutralize language is essentially the Newspeak of George Orwell's Animal Farm.
But then the Israeli story took a sudden twist when the F banned American airlines from flying to Tel Aviv, forcing a complete turnaround in Zionist newspeak on complicit US media outlets.
Of course, when we complained the health authority did a 1984 with a response of "less is more, worse is better" attitude that out-Big Brothered George Orwell's Big Brother, and his Newspeak.
At first blush, by adopting the liquidators' newspeak and the international regulatory agenda, the FIO seemed to have missed an opportunity to focus attention on one area of state-regulation of insurance ripe for close scrutiny and national attention.
Free speech has been replaced by "Newspeak" - the only vocabulary that gets smaller, denying citizens the power of expression.