Newsreel


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Newsreel

 

a filmed communiqué of current events and facts.

Unlike film journalism, which deals with the facts in their entirety, the newsreel restricts itself to the communication of information and the statement of facts with only brief commentary. However, with the aid of certain visual techniques, such as foreshortening, frame composition, and the careful selection of details, the cameraman often expresses his own artistic and journalistic view of the event. The newsreel forms the basis of news serials, special releases, thematic serials, film interviews, news commentaries, and topical film satire. It is also a major source for film annals of historic events. The basic technique of the newsreel is photoreportage. The television newsreel, the most efficient and immediate way to provide filmed information (telereportage on videotape), has been assuming increasing importance.

References in periodicals archive ?
I'M DELIGHTED TO BE PARTICIPATING in 'Orphans III' and to have the opportunity to talk about one of my favourite subjects--the Cinesound Review newsreel, the Voice of Australia.
But while Newsreel XLVII presents remunerative work for men as completely positive, an untainted "OPPORTUNITY" (53), it is significant that Newsreel LI combines the concept of economic independence for females with insidious suggestions of failure and even death.
Not quite five minutes long, the silent newsreel consists of a series of movie clips showing various rabbis and dignitaries exiting a public street into a gated courtyard and walking toward a stationary camera.
The newsreel recorded events in Redcar and "A Year in the Life of Redcar, a Town in the 1950s" was showcased three times a year at the Queen's Hotel.
There will also be a newsreel from 1963 reviewing the first 10 years of the Queen''s reign.
Hosted as part of the Wednesday Heritage Club, the screening of archive newsreels promises a fascinating trip back in time, especially in the wake of this summer's Olympic success and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.
Its entire archive of newsreel, sports footage, social history documentaries, entertainment and music stories from 1896 to 1976 can now be viewed for free at www.britishpathe.com British pathe Press Officer Jack Cullen said: "All 90,000 canisters from our Pinewood vaults have been digitised, tagged, organised and made accessible to the public."
Ken recalls: "We had no telly in those days and would head to The Tatler to see the Pathe Newsreel. Fortunately I now have the match on a DVD".
In the mid-1930s Time magazine executive Roy Larsen conceived of a newsreel called The March of Time, and he brought in veteran newsreel cameraman and producer Louis de Rochemont to create the best in the business.
Oscar-winning editor Jim Clark originally discovered the three minutes of newsreel footage in London and used it in his 1964 documentary about Senghenydd, near Caerphilly.
The film features the conflict between TV news pioneer Ed Murrow and Senator Joseph McCarthy, played by himself in newsreel footage