Newton's first law


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Related to Newton's first law: Newton's law of gravitation, Law of inertia

Newton's first law

[′nüt·ənz ′fərst ′lȯ]
(mechanics)
The law that a particle not subjected to external forces remains at rest or moves with constant speed in a straight line. Also known as first law of motion; Galileo's law of inertia.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a sample test item--an original item rather than one from the Force Concept Inventory--from the Newton's First Law test:
Hawk keeps his feet in the air while the board rotates (Newton's First Law).
Whitehead holds that Newton's First Law of Motion "is the first article of the creed of science." (4) This orthodox creed denies inherent natures and final causes: There persists, however, throughout the whole period the fixed scientific cosmology which presupposes the ultimate fact of an irreducible brute matter ...
Newton's First Law of Motion is a law we must understand and live with everyday.
The term we normally use to represent Newton's First Law of Motion is "inertia," which relates to an object's amount of resistance to change in velocity.
4.1 Newton's First Law: A priori truth or an experimental fact?
* An object in motion tends to remain in motion until acted upon by an external force (Newton's first law of motion).
If you don't know Newton's first law of physics, take heart--some textbooks don't either.
Many of the errors are serious: One textbook bungles Newton's first law of physics, while another includes a map showing the equator running through the United States.
Newton's first law of motion: "A body in uniform motion remains in motion until it is acted upon by an external force."
Sir Isaac Newton's First Law of Motion can be rewritten for pitchers: "The velocity of a fastball relates only to the force that the pitcher applies directly toward home plate."
Discuss what modifications they made, how the marble moved after it was ejected, and how they saw Newton's First Law in action.