Newton's first law


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Related to Newton's first law: Newton's law of gravitation, Law of inertia

Newton's first law

[′nüt·ənz ′fərst ′lȯ]
(mechanics)
The law that a particle not subjected to external forces remains at rest or moves with constant speed in a straight line. Also known as first law of motion; Galileo's law of inertia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Against the views of these philosophers, one begins to see that inertia is an inherent principle and is natural in the Aristotelian sense by considering why Newton's First Law of Motion is also called the principle of inertia.
Newton's First Law of Motion is a law we must understand and live with everyday.
The term we normally use to represent Newton's First Law of Motion is "inertia," which relates to an object's amount of resistance to change in velocity.
Newton's First Law can be deduced from the law of inertia stated in section 3 and specifically from equations (8) and (9), or from corollary II.
Sir Isaac Newton's First Law of Motion can be rewritten for pitchers: "The velocity of a fastball relates only to the force that the pitcher applies directly toward home plate.
CHICAGO -- Newton's first law states that an object at rest tends to stay at rest.
Help students get grounded in concepts like Newton's First Law, acceleration, trajectory, and potential and kinetic energy.
That's because each time the sled stops, a player has to contend with Newton's First Law of Motion, which states that an object at rest has the tendency to remain at rest.
Photo: Demonstration of Newton's First Law of Motion Second Place Matthew Claspill, Helias High School, Jefferson City, Mo.
The kids are well-versed in Newton's First Law of Motion.
He writes that a perfect example of Newton's first law of motion--which states that an object in motion stays in motion until met by an external force, and that the more massive the object, the more inclined it is to continue to move--is William "The Refrigerator" Perry, an occasional fullback for the Chicago Bears in the 1980s.
CHICAGO -- Newton's first law of investing would be that stocks that are going higher tend to continue to rise.