Newton's second law


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Newton's second law

[′nüt·ənz ′sek·ənd ′lȯ]
(mechanics)
The law that the acceleration of a particle is directly proportional to the resultant external force acting on the particle and is inversely proportional to the mass of the particle. Also known as second law of motion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the volunteer is not accelerating, Newton's Second Law tells us that the net force acting on the volunteer must be zero, and hence these two forces acting on the volunteer are of equal magnitude.
Similarly, assuming that for Newton's second law, the related exponent is also unknown, and we only know the form of this formula is as follows
Using persuasion and participation will aid our change through Newton's Second Law. By involving those needing to change up-front, we may be able to diminish that "mass" that may hinder the move toward change.
WebQuests: A short term WebQuest on Newton's second law was developed by the researchers (See Appendix A).
Newton's Second Law A force on an object Putting pressure on the causes the object to side of the ski propels accelerate (or skiers in the direction decelerate) in the they want to go.
Proof Applying the Newton's second law and Theorem 3 to this particle, we have m dv/dt = -[rho]Q(u - v) + F.
I must be honest, though, and say I take my hat off to anyone who can even contemplate explaining Newton's Second Law of Force and Motion to the average footballer.
The magnitude of the load reaction drops because of the stopping reaction that occurs (implied in Newton's Second Law of motion).
You can also find out about Newton's second law of gravity while keeping a ball suspended in the air with a hairdryer-like contraption.
Gramer, Gornitz and Weizsacker use Newton's second law as an example.
Newton's Second Law of Motion: The relationship between an object's mass m, its acceleration a, and the applied force F is F = ma.
The articles include the Olympiad experience; Newton's second law of motion using fan carts; methane can explosion; boiling water; metric versus imperial and slime ball by CSIRO.