Newtonian mechanics


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Newtonian mechanics

[′nü′tō·nē·ən mi′kan·iks]
(mechanics)
The system of mechanics based upon Newton's laws of motion in which mass and energy are considered as separate, conservative, mechanical properties, in contrast to their treatment in relativistic mechanics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some parts of natural science, like Newtonian mechanics, have theories with deductive structures, and exact and testable predictions can be made from the premises (axioms) of the theory with the addition of appropriate empirical `boundary conditions'.
They may have gotten better at Newtonian mechanics and mathematics, as Brett Steele has shown (again uncited by Alder), but this hardly qualifies them as minor philosophes or their followers.
Unable to reconcile observation to what Newtonian mechanics predicted regarding the planet's path, French astronomer U.
When devising, or revising, these programs, the new physics of alternative histories and multiple universes has replaced Newtonian mechanics.
quantum mechanics, must be applied to sub-atomic particles and is not needed in our day-today world where classical Newtonian mechanics (which, it can be shown, is a limiting case of quantum mechanics) would do.
Cohen argues that, before nineteenth century energy physics, attempts to construct economics with the Newtonian mechanics paradigm failed.
While the older crafts and models of Newtonian mechanics and workaday chemistry drove the great economic and social engines of the Victorian era, in the waning decade of the century, Edison, Marconi, and others sounded the opening theme of the next, electric era.