Newtonian mechanics


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Newtonian mechanics

[′nü′tō·nē·ən mi′kan·iks]
(mechanics)
The system of mechanics based upon Newton's laws of motion in which mass and energy are considered as separate, conservative, mechanical properties, in contrast to their treatment in relativistic mechanics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus it is important to distinguish between what we claim when we say that Newtonian mechanics constitutes a limiting case of relativity theory, and how we ought to interpret this claim.
in the context of Lorentz electron theory or Newtonian mechanics and gravitation?
This inversion corresponds to a physically possible process, given the temporal symmetry of the laws of Newtonian mechanics (Earman makes use of the temporal symmetry of the laws of mechanics in the same way in his examples).
Alan Gabbey discusses mechanics and warns that there is more to the story of mechanical science than is found in tracking the prehistory of Newtonian mechanics.
Though science can enrich our lives we can live without knowledge of Newtonian mechanics, cell theory and DNA.
The computer, using a technique Barr calls "dynamic restraint," applies the rules of Newtonian mechanics and automatically calculates the forces and torques necessary to achieve the preset motion goals.
To take an example from physics, an understanding of classical Newtonian mechanics is changed by the realization that at certain times scales, or a certain size scales, quantum effects come into play.
Author Vijay Tymms presents students and physics instructors with an undergraduate-level text on Newtonian mechanics designed to help students with the transition from high school physics to collegiate study of the subject.
For example, Newtonian mechanics is acceptable for cases where the following conditions hold: the velocity is much smaller than the speed of light, the classical limit of quantum mechanics holds, and the force can be calculated in terms of position, time and velocity.
Romanticism spills out of the arts and into other areas: into science, though not into Newtonian mechanics (as with Kant and Spinoza) but, rather, into a more organic view of nature.
They cover differential equations and their solutions, linear differential equations, second-order ordinary differential equations and the calculus of variations, Newtonian mechanics, and numerical methods.
Metaphysicians and philosophers of science have devoted many a paper to the seemingly irreconcilable discontinuity between the classical and the quantum worlds, between Newtonian mechanics and quantum mechanics.