Nicaea


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Nicaea

Nicaea (nīsēˈə), city of Bithnyia, N Asia Minor, built in the 4th cent. B.C. by Antigonus I as Antigonia and renamed Nicaea by Lysimachus for his wife. It flourished under the Romans. It was the scene of the ecumenical council called in A.D. 325 by Constantine I, and a second council held there in 787 sanctioned the devotional use of images (see Nicaea, First Council of and Nicaea, Second Council of). The city, captured by the Turks in 1078 and by the Crusaders in 1097 (see also Nicaea, empire of), passed finally to the Turks in 1330. It is sometimes called Nice. The modern İznik, Turkey, is on the site.
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Nicaea

an ancient city in NW Asia Minor, in Bithynia: site of the first council of Nicaea (325 ad), which composed the Nicene Creed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Creed Catholics recite every Sunday, formulated at the Council of Nicaea in 325 and refined at the Council of Constantinople in 381, elegantly strings together the central dogmas of the church, revealing a multidimensional but coherent worldview.
If so, he may have backed it up by sending the latter a repeat of his earlier broadside written soon after Nicaea, to assure Athanasius, not quite sincerely, of his continuing anti-Arian stance.
In the theologically complex and chaotic years following the Council of Nicaea theology was influenced, and often distorted by personal, political, and linguistic controversies.
has in dialogue with Nicaea and Chalcedon re-opened the question in a new way.
The council of Nicaea had both Greek and Latin speaking delegates.
At the Council of Nicaea in 325, the legend goes, Nicholas punched the arch-heretic Arius.
This we confess in obedience to the Holy Scriptures and the faith of the three Ecumenical Councils assembled in Nicaea, Constantinople, and Ephesus."
325, the Emperor Constantine, who favored Christianity, convened a meeting of Christian leaders to resolve important disputes at the Council of Nicaea. The most fateful of its decisions was about the status of Christ, whom the council recognized as (https://global.oup.com/academic/product/nicaea-and-its-legacy-9780198755050?lang=en&cc=us) "fully human and fully divine." This council also resolved that Easter should be fixed on a Sunday, not on day 14 of Nisan.
What name is given to the statement of Christian belief accepted by the first Council of Nicaea in 325?
The method for setting the date was agreed on at the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD.
The text depicts a second journey, that of the scrolls themselves, from their origin in ancient Anatolia, through Judea to Constantine's Council at Nicaea, and then west to Iberia and the medieval kingdoms of the Visigoths, Moors, and Spaniards, at last coming to rest in modern Granada.
In 325, the Council of Nicaea established that Easter would be held on the first Sunday after the first full moon occurring on or after the vernal equinox.