Nicaraguans


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Nicaraguans

 

the people constituting the bulk of the population (about 85 percent) of the Republic of Nicaragua and numbering about 1.7 million persons (1972, estimate). They speak Spanish. The majority are Roman Catholics, and the remainder are Protestants. Most Nicaraguans are mestizos (ladinos)—descendants of Spanish settlers from the 16th through the 20th centuries who intermarried with the indigenous Indians (Miskito, Sumu, and other tribes) and with the Negroes who came to Nicaragua as fugitive slaves in the 17th century. The Nicaraguans also include Creoles and descendants of immigrants from the USA and various European countries. Most Nicaraguans live along the Pacific coast. Their principal occupations are farming (corn, rice, beans, sorghum, and bananas), animal husbandry, fishing, plantation work (cotton, coffee, and bananas), and, to a lesser extent, industrial work. (For the history, economy, and culture of the Nicaraguans, see.)

REFERENCE

Narody Ameriki, vol. 2. Moscow, 1959.
References in periodicals archive ?
The United States and Nicaragua are parties to an extradition treaty dating back to 1905 and ratified in 1907, but the Nicaraguan constitution bars the extradition of Nicaraguan citizens.
Costa Rica has claimed Nicaraguan troops were illegally occupying an area of 1.
Nicaraguan troops crossed the San Juan river, landed in Costa Rica's Isla Calero region, planted their flag and set up camp.
Nicaraguans appear to have established a relatively strong sense of personal security in the years since he left office: the majority (60%) mention feeling safe walking alone at night, and 51% say they have confidence in their local police.
They are organized under the Confederacion Solidaridad (CS), which brings together several organizations of Nicaraguans in Costa Rica.
In the tremendously speculative world of Nicaraguan real estate, where the cowboys of high-risk investing ride high, Larry Banchero stands apart from the crowd.
Service work in Nicaragua puts students in direct contact with Nicaraguans who live in extreme poverty, and this experience often triggers visceral emotional reactions that cause students to assess their personal strengths and critique their weaknesses.
Costa Rica--In February, Rosa the 9-year-old daughter of an impoverished Nicaraguan migrant worker in neighbouring Costa Rica, was found to be pregnant.
In the San Fernando Valley, the influx of Central Americans is evident in restaurants along Van Nuys Boulevard that sell pita-like pupusas and in the emerging Salvadoran, Guatemalan and Nicaraguan business communities.
The occasional foreign reporter who stumbles in by error inevitably mentions the new shopping malls and hotels only by way of pointing out that most Nicaraguans can't afford them.
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White signals the tremendous influence that Coronel Urtecho's translation of North American poets has had on his own poetry and that of other Nicaraguans.