Heliogravure

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Related to Nicephore Niepce: Louis Daguerre

Heliogravure

 

one of the methods of gravure in which the printing form is made by using photographic and chemical processes. Heliogravure first appeared in the second half of the 19th century.

The diapositive of the image is copied on paper that has a light-sensitive layer of gelatin (pigment paper). The copy is transferred to a copper plate covered with grains of asphalt, which form a screen. As a result of the development of the copy there appears on the plate a gelatinous relief of various thicknesses, depending on the degree of saturation of the colors of the image. Treatment with a ferric chloride solution results in the formation of deepened printing elements on the plate. The heliogravure method is distinguished by the high quality of reproduction. However, its productivity is low, and it has been replaced by gravure using a doctor blade.

References in periodicals archive ?
The French inventor, Joseph Nicephore Niepce, experimented for years with light-sensitive chemicals before finally discovering the right combination, creating the first true photograph in 1827.
On This Day March 7: 1765: Birth of French photographic inventor Joseph Nicephore Niepce.
IN 1826, by Nicephore Niepce, a French amateur scientist.
Like Joseph Nicephore Niepce, who made the first photograph by developing an asphaltum-coated pewter plate in a solution of lavender oil, Gonzalez Palma uses asphaltum to create his images.
The first recorded photograph, taken in 1825 by Frenchman Nicephore Niepce (he called photography "sun-writing"), depicts a view outside his window.
What have i) Joseph Nicephore Niepce (1765-1833), ii) Louis Daguerre (1787-1851), and iii) Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877) in common ?
France's Nicephore Niepce made the first successful photograph in 1826 but it was the accidental spillage of a jar of mercury by his successor, LJM Daguerre, who really took the process forward.
In response to Henri Frederic Amiel's Romantic description of a landscape as a slate of the soul, Edgar Degas, an inveterate photographer, retorted, "No, it is a state of the eyes" (why not even "artificial retinas," as Nicephore Niepce, a pioneer of photography, put it)?