shape memory alloy

(redirected from Nickel-titanium alloy)

shape memory alloy

[′shāp ¦mem·rē ′al‚ȯi]
(metallurgy)
An alloy that, after being deformed, can recover its original shape when it is heated.
References in periodicals archive ?
EdgeFile X1 (EdgeEndo) features a constant .06 tapered reciprocating instrument with a triangular cross-section and annealed heat-treated nickel-titanium alloy (Fire-Wire[TM]), which according to manufacturer, increases flexural strength, enhancing durability and flexibility.
The Nickel-Titanium alloy (nitinol) has been found to be the most useful shape memory alloy in biomedical applications, and increased utilization of this alloy to manufacture various medical devices has changed the algorithm of disease treatment.
Its revolutionary Smileloc device utilizes the shape memory properties of 'nitinol', a nickel-titanium alloy, to attach crowns or dentures to implant abutments without cement or retaining screws.
Namerow, "Comparison between a novel nickel-titanium alloy and 508 nitinol on the cyclic fatigue life of ProFile 25/.04 rotary instruments," Journal of Endodontics, vol.
The memory metal nickel-titanium alloy was first developed by the US Naval Ordnance Laboratory in the 1960s and commercialised under the name Nitinol, but BAE Systems believes this is the first time it has been used to build an entire suspension system.
The mechanical behavior of nickel-titanium alloy is more close to that of bone tissue in comparison with other metallic implants, and it has greater effects on the bone growth and treatment of the damaged tissue.
Peralta, who is board-certified in veterinary dentistry, "Also, the files are made of a nickel-titanium alloy, making them incredibly flexible and more resistant to breakage and other complications compared to conventional stainless steel hand files."
Testarelli, "Mechanical properties of a new and improved nickel-titanium alloy for endodontic use: an evaluation of file flexibility," Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology, vol.
They then looked for ways to create artificial muscle, ultimately settling on a nickel-titanium alloy.
It is made from nitinol, a nickel-titanium alloy with so-called "superelastic" shape-memory properties so that it does not lose its shape if the ear is knocked.