Nicopolis


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Nicopolis

(nĭkŏp`əlĭs, nī–) [Gr.,=city of victory], ancient city, NW Greece, in Epirus. It was founded by Octavian (later Augustus) to celebrate the victory (31 B.C.) at Actium, which is nearby. The city largely eclipsed Ambracia (see ÁrtaÁrta
, formerly Ambracia
, city (1991 pop. 21,286), capital of Árta prefecture, W Greece, in Epirus, near the mouth of the Arachtus River. It is a trading and shipping center for agricultural goods including cotton, grain, citrus fruits, almonds, and
..... Click the link for more information.
). It is mentioned by St. Paul (Titus 3.12). Its ruins are near the modern Préveza.

Nicopolis

 

(in Greek, “city of victory”), the name of a number of cities founded by the Romans. The largest were Nicopolis in Cappadocia, founded by Pompey in commemoration of the victory over Mithridates VI Eupator in 66 B.C.; Nicopolis in Epirus, founded by Augustus in memory of the victory at Actium in 31 B.C.; and Nicopolis in Lower Moesia (Nicopolis ad Istrum, 20 km east of the modern city of Veliko Turnovo in Bulgaria), founded by Trajan after the victory over the Dacians in A.D. 102.

Nicopolis ad Istrum reached its zenith in the second and third centuries; it was destroyed by the Avars in the early seventh century. Periodic excavations, the first of which was in 1899, have uncovered the remains of defensive walls, a forum, a bouleuterion, an odeum, baths, and shops, as well as sculptures, inscriptions, coins, and household items.

REFERENCES

“Nikopolis.” In Paulys Realencyclopädie der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft, vol. 33. Stuttgart, 1936. Columns 511–39.
Ivanov, T. “Razskopki v Nikopolis ad Istrum, prez 1945 g.” Izvestiia na Arkheologicheskiia institut, book 18. Sofia, 1952.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gingerbread was popularized by the Armenian monk, Gregory of Nicopolis (later Saint Gregory) and rapidly became a part of the Medieval European culinary tradition.
Murad's successor, Beyazit I, defeated the last great crusade, led by Sigismund of Hungary, at Nicopolis in 1396.
The reader, however, will not find any mention of the possible cause(s) for the site's decline (one explanation might be the foundation of the Roman colony of Nicopolis by the soon-to-be-emperor Augustus in honour of his victory at the Battle of Actium; the inhabitants of a number of surrounding cities were forcibly relocated to the new colony; more on abandoned cities anon).
Among the topics are military service and the dynamics of recruitment in 14th-century England, gentry enthusiasm for Edward I's Scottish campaigns 1296-1307, Welsh knights of the 14th century, Breton soldiers from the Battle of the Thirty in March 1351 to Nicopolis in September 1396, and the English reversal of fortunes in the 1370s and the experience of prisoners of war.
33) This, however, is not to say that Octavian did not commemorate his victory at Actium though temples and statues in cities far away from Rome--most notably at Actium, Nicopolis and Alexandria.
95) Nor should it be assumed that the Cappadocian army relied exclusively on grain from the Bosporan Kingdom and elsewhere via Trapezus, as the fertile plains around Nicopolis, a colonia founded by Pompey in 66 BC in Armenia Minor, were no doubt exploited.
He left his native country, Spain, as a child in 1492, and then left Portugal in 1497, later living in the Balkans (at first in Nicopolis in the north-western part of present-day Greece, then from the early 1520s in Adrianople in present-day Turkish Thrace, then in Salonica and Constantinople), eventually moving to Safed in the Galilee, where he died in 1575.
Crowds flocked to Nicopolis to listen to Epictetus, arguably the second greatest of the Stoic teachers.
According to a report in the Balkan Travellers, the sanctuary was found by archaeologists in the vicinity of the Nicopolis ad Istrum ancient site, located near the town of Veliko Tarnovo in central Bulgaria.
On the 27th of April 1883, through the apostolic letter Praecipuum munus, Pope Leon the 13th separated the Apostolic Vicarship of Vallachia of the Nicopolis ad Istrum Bishopry, and the Monseigneur Ignazio Paoli was appointed residential bishop.
Ulfilas likely returned to his home in the town of Nicopolis ad Istrum, a few miles south of the river's banks.
This proved unsuccessful, in 1396 the Christian allies, under the leadership of the Hungarian King and Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund, were defeated in the Battle of Nicopolis.