nidamental gland

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nidamental gland

[¦nīd·ə¦ment·əl ′gland]
(zoology)
Any of various structures that secrete covering material for eggs or egg masses.
References in periodicals archive ?
An inner layer of jelly is first provided by the oviducal gland, after which the nidamental glands add an outer layer of jelly (von Boletzky 1989).
The reproductive system of a mature ommastrephid female consists of a single ovary, paired oviducts, and oviducal and nidamental glands.
Internal organs, such as the testis in males and the oviducal and nidamental glands in females, were readily visible in our specimens.
The red accessory nidamental gland occurred more than 10 times during the entire video footage (Table 3), usually during the daytime, when the females positioned themselves parallel to the males.
The structure, phylogenetic significance, and function of the nidamental glands of some elasmobranchs of the Madras coast.
Structure and function of the nidamental gland of Chyloscyllium grisseum (Muller and Henle).
It was described for females as (1) immature (stage 1): short and translucid nidamental gland and transparent ovary; (2) maturation (stage 2): cream nidamental glands and granulated ovary; (3) mature (stage 3): larger nidamental glands (20%-50% of the mantle cavity) and ovary full of eggs, yellow colored; and (4) spawned (stage 4): flaccid and reduced nidamental glands and oviduct with some eggs.
natural eggs) revealed that aggressive responses to extracts from nidamental and accessory nidamental glands were significantly lower than responses to natural eggs.
Besides indices, 1 of 3 maturity stages was assigned to the specimen collected in different seasons based on the color of accessory nidamental glands and size of the gonads according to Lipinski (1979).
4 mm diameter), most often seen in reproductive tissues such as the testicular ducts and accessory nidamental glands (Fig.
Within the egg case, the embryos are embedded in gelatinous substances released from three accessory reproductive organs - the oviducal and nidamental glands, and presumably, the accessory nidamental (AN) gland (Arnold, 1984; Boletzky, 1986).
Because the ANG is a reproductive organ and is located immediately adjacent to the egg-producing nidamental glands (9), the antifungal activities of Alteromonas may suggest a mutualistic role for ANG bacteria in the cephalopod's life cycle.