Nihongi

Nihongi

 

(Nihon Shoki, Chronicles of Japan), a chronicle of the reigns of emperors of Japan from ancient times until 697. It was compiled in 720 and fills 31 volumes. The first two volumes are a collection of Japanese myths and the rest contain chronicles of the reigns of emperors and excerpts from official Japanese records and documents and from Korean chronicles. The last volume, consisting of heraldic records, has been lost. The 40-volume Shoku Nihongi (Continuation of the Chronicles of Japan), covering the period from 697 to 791, contains the same kinds of chronicles as the Nihongi but includes more documents, as well as biographical information about religious and political figures.

PUBLICATIONS

Nihon Shoki (Annals of Japan), vols. 1–3. Edited by Kuroita Katsumi. Tokyo, 1931.
Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan From the Earliest Times to A.D. 697. Translated by W. G. Aston. London, 1956.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sequel to the Chronicles of Japan, the Shoku nihongi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which was completed in 797, also contains some tantalizing evidence.
An entry in Shoku nihongi dated 790 consists of a speech made to a person of Paekche descent living in Japan, recalling that the first books transmitted to Japan came from the Korean kingdom of Paekche and that those books facilitated the development of Confucianism and the emergence of literature in Japan.
Shinto, described sometimes as "this-worldly" religion, is indigenous Japanese religious tradition and Kojiki and Nihongi reflect its basic themes.
After all, from a viewpoint of the editors of Nihongi, tsuchigumo is a certified enemy of the central government.
Indeed, in the world of Nihongi, Nihihayahi suddenly showed up one day to Nagasunehiko's region, just as Haku did in the land of the bathhouse.
28) Shoku Nihongi (Continued History of Japan), compiled in Chinese, mentions that in 706 C.
Like the rest of the multimedia cast of fashion, music and technology experts contributing to Womb's total club concept, Womb's art director, Kei Nihongi, is "very cool and totally professional," notes Takahashi.
Professor Beasley begins with the earliest accounts of Japan's history as reflected in the legends expounded by the eighth-century chronicles, the Kojiki ('Record of Ancient Things') and the Nihon Shoki (bynamed Nihongi, 'The early Days of Japan'), to the arrival of Buddhism in the sixth century.
See SNKBT Shoku Nihongi 1 (Iwanami shoten, 1989), 42-43.
I, on my part, feel a certain kinship with Korea, given the fact that it is recorded in the Shoku Nihongi (Chronicles of Japan compiled in 797) that the mother of Emperor Kammu (reign 781-806) was of the line of King Muryong (reign 501-523) of the Kingdom of Paekche,'' the emperor said.
For an example of large-scale naturalization of Koreans in the eighth century, see Shoku Nihongi, vol.
39 From the information provided by Nihongi and Michiko Y.