Nikolai Nikolaevich

Nikolai Nikolaevich

 

(the Younger). Born Nov. 6 (18), 1856, in St. Petersburg; died Jan. 5, 1929, in Antibes, France. Russian grand duke, son of Nikolai Nikolaevich, the Elder; adjutant general (1894), general of the cavalry (1901).

Nikolai Nikolaevich graduated from the Nicholas Engineering School in 1873 and from the Academy of the General Staff in 1876. During the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78 he carried out special assignments for his father, the commander in chief; he subsequently commanded the Hussars Life Guard Regiment. From 1895 to 1905 he was inspector general of the cavalry. From 1905 to 1914 he commanded guards units and the St. Petersburg Military District, while at the same time (1905–08) acting as chairman of the Council of State Defense. In World War I he was supreme commander from July 20 (Aug. 2), 1914, to Aug. 23 (Sept. 5), 1915. He was replaced at the insistence of Empress Aleksandra Fedorovna, who feared his growing influence. From August 1915 to Mar. 2 (15), 1917, Nikolai Nikolaevich was commander in chief of the troops of the Caucasus Front. When Nicholas II abdicated on Mar. 2(15), 1917, he appointed Nikolai Nikolaevich supreme commander in chief; but, under pressure from the soviets and the Provisional Government, the latter had to decline the position. Nikolai Nikolaevich emigrated from the Crimea in March 1919, residing first in Italy and later in France. Among the White émigrés, he was considered a pretender to the Russian throne.


Nikolai Nikolaevich

 

(the Elder). Born July 27 (Aug. 8), 1831, in Tsarskoe Selo, now the city of Pushkin; died Apr. 13 (25), 1891, in Alupka. Russian grand duke, third son of Emperor Nicholas I, adjutant general (1856), field marshal (1878).

Nikolai Nikolaevich studied in the First Cadet Corps and began his military service in 1851 in the Life Guards Horse Cavalry Regiment. In 1852 he commanded a brigade, and in 1856 a guards cavalry division. From 1852 (in actuality from 1856) to 1891 he was inspector general of military engineering. In 1855 he became a member of the State Council. In 1859 he took command of a guards reserve cavalry corps. In 1861 he commanded a detached guards corps. From 1864 to 1880 he was commander of the troops of the guards and the St. Petersburg Military District, while at the same time acting as inspector general of the cavalry (1864–91). During the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78, Nikolai Nikolaevich was commander in chief of the Danube Army. He was neither a clever nor a balanced man, and he did not possess the qualities of a military leader. His influence on the course of military events was mainly negative. In 1880 he became seriously ill and ceased to play an active role.

References in periodicals archive ?
Translated by Roger Cooke, The Case of Academician Nikolai Nikolaevich Luzin (the case), debuts 15 years after the publication of the Russian original.
The first article is by Paul Robinson, whose biography on Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich, the first of its kind in English, will be published later this year.
One of several books Shmidt sent me over the years is Biblioteka Ivan Groznogo, a book that he edited containing Amosov's annotated edition of a "reconstruction" of the tsar's library undertaken but never published by Nikolai Nikolaevich Zarubin in the 1930s.
Explorers discussed include Ermak Timofeev, Vasilii Danilovich Poiarkov, Erofei Pavlovich Khabarov, Semen Ivanovich Dezhnev, Aleksei Chirikhov, Nikolai Nikolaevich Miklukho-Maklai, Petr Petrovich Semenov-Tian-Shanskii, and Valentina Tereshkova.
Nikolai Nikolaevich Voronov and Semen Ilich Makeiev
When the excitement quelled, his findings proved more than sufficient to sustain the project: the person behind the character of Count Vronskii, Count Nikolai Nikolaevich Raevskii (1839-1876), Tolstoy's relative, was an amalgam of manly, noble honor and sensitive, dedicated, romantic love, whose life was permanently affected by an all-consuming passion.
Forced to lie on his back for several weeks after an operation, Izrael Getzler decided to re-read one of the treasures of his library, the seven-volume Zapiski revoliutsii (Notes on the Revolution) by Nikolai Nikolaevich Sukhanov.
Petersburg, the son of Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich, younger brother of Czar Alexander II (November 18, 1856); he entered the army (1872); served on the staff of his father, then Russian commander in chief, during the Russo-Turkish War (April 24, 1877-March 3, 1878); joined the Guard Hussar Regiment, rising to command that unit (1884); appointed inspector general of cavalry (1895); holding that post for ten years, he introduced reforms in training and equipment, modernizing the Russian cavalry; appointed commander of the St.
He has written several other novels and short stories, of which some have been translated into English and collected under the title Nikolai Nikolaevich (1980).
3) The Commander-in-Chief of the Caucasus Army, Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich (1856-1929; he was also the Viceroy of the Caucasus), telegraphed Tsar Nicholas II (1868-1918) informing him of the victory:
Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich did not want the tsar at the front, both because he genuinely feared for his safety and because he himself loathed being in danger.
has been receiving recognition in the USA ever since the 1980 publication of Nikolai Nikolaevich & Maskirovka (see WLT 55:2, p.

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