Nicopolis

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Nicopolis

(nĭkŏp`əlĭs, nī–) [Gr.,=city of victory], ancient city, NW Greece, in Epirus. It was founded by Octavian (later Augustus) to celebrate the victory (31 B.C.) at Actium, which is nearby. The city largely eclipsed Ambracia (see ÁrtaÁrta
, formerly Ambracia
, city (1991 pop. 21,286), capital of Árta prefecture, W Greece, in Epirus, near the mouth of the Arachtus River. It is a trading and shipping center for agricultural goods including cotton, grain, citrus fruits, almonds, and
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). It is mentioned by St. Paul (Titus 3.12). Its ruins are near the modern Préveza.

Nicopolis

 

(in Greek, “city of victory”), the name of a number of cities founded by the Romans. The largest were Nicopolis in Cappadocia, founded by Pompey in commemoration of the victory over Mithridates VI Eupator in 66 B.C.; Nicopolis in Epirus, founded by Augustus in memory of the victory at Actium in 31 B.C.; and Nicopolis in Lower Moesia (Nicopolis ad Istrum, 20 km east of the modern city of Veliko Turnovo in Bulgaria), founded by Trajan after the victory over the Dacians in A.D. 102.

Nicopolis ad Istrum reached its zenith in the second and third centuries; it was destroyed by the Avars in the early seventh century. Periodic excavations, the first of which was in 1899, have uncovered the remains of defensive walls, a forum, a bouleuterion, an odeum, baths, and shops, as well as sculptures, inscriptions, coins, and household items.

REFERENCES

“Nikopolis.” In Paulys Realencyclopädie der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft, vol. 33. Stuttgart, 1936. Columns 511–39.
Ivanov, T. “Razskopki v Nikopolis ad Istrum, prez 1945 g.” Izvestiia na Arkheologicheskiia institut, book 18. Sofia, 1952.
References in periodicals archive ?
Medicinski i farmacevticni instrumenti i posobija ot Nikopolis ad Istrum i gradskata mu teritorija.
From the ancient city of Nikopolis, built in 31BC, to Nekromanteion, on a hill above what in ancient times was the mouth of the River Acheron, the mythical River Styx, gateway to the underworld.
Nikopolis in 728/1396, overshadowed, perhaps, by the disaster at Ankara in 1402 and the taking of Constantinople in 1453).
A Roman circus is documented at Gortyn in Crete (administratively a part of Roman North Africa); another must have existed at Nikopolis in Epirus, and a Late Roman example is known in Thessaloniki.
Lines 11-12 also recall an epigram by Glaukos of Nikopolis.
Wiseman, director of the expedition known as the Nikopolis Project.
Corinthe et Nikopolis pendant le bas moyen-age," FelRav 118 (1979), pp.
Eusebius places it seven miles along the road to Nikopolis, not Neapolis.
He called this new city Nikopolis from his victory over Antony and Cleopatra.