Nineteenth Amendment


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Nineteenth Amendment

granted women right to vote (1920). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 409]
References in periodicals archive ?
What stands out is the Nineteenth Amendment argument.
In fact, only Tennessee and Kentucky ratified the Nineteenth Amendment.
A review of the territory: The Nineteenth Amendment was not as revolutionary as it may seem.
103) Furthermore, many who opposed the Nineteenth Amendment argued that women did not need the right to vote since they could rely on their husbands for virtual representation.
Chapter Six, "Feminists and Suffragists," begins with the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 and carries the story of the fight for women's suffrage through to the Nineteenth Amendment of 1920.
ERA first came before Congress in December 1923 as a logical successor to the Nineteenth Amendment granting women's suffrage.
Board of Education, the Nineteenth Amendment, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, when government no longer supports a pervasive personal prejudice, that personal prejudice becomes less pervasive.
The standard story claims that the movement was born at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848 and ended with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, mandating woman suffrage, in 1920.
Since the Nineteenth Amendment made women equal voters, the Second Amendment demands that they be given equal status in arms.
In 29 states, suffragists were able to win significant voting rights prior to passage of the Nineteenth Amendment.
In a recent article in the Harvard Law Review, David Strauss contends that the story of the Nineteenth Amendment and the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) proves the irrelevance of amendments in our constitutional tradition, and more generally illustrates the insignificant role that constitutional text plays in the articulation of constitutional norms.
The triumph but also the beginning came with the passage of the nineteenth amendment in 1920.