Crested Ibis

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Crested Ibis

 

(Nipponia nippori), a bird of the family Threskiornithidae of the order Ciconiiformes. Body length, 75–80 cm. It has a crest of long feathers on the occiput. In the winter the plumage is white with a pink bloom; in the summer the head, neck, and back are ashen gray. The facial parts of the head are bare and orange-red in color. The legs are brownish red, and the bill is black with a red tip. It is a dying species. Several dozen nest in Japan on Honshu and Sado islands. The colony of crested ibises on the Oki islands disappeared after 1920; it has nested in Korea and Northeast China. In the USSR the crested ibis is an extremely rare migratory bird; in the 19th century it nested in the southern Primor’e.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The species - Latin name Nipponia nippon - is also known as the Japanese crested ibis, but is best known in the South for a popular children's song composed in the 1920s, when Korea was under Japanese colonial rule.
Only a small number of bird IFITM sequences have been deposited in public databases, including Gallus gallus IFITM1-like (GenBank: XM_001233949), Anas platyrhynchos IFITM1 (GenBank: KF584226), Gallus gallus IFITM3-like (GenBank: XM_420925), Anas platyrhynchos IFITM3 (GenBank: KF584228), Serinus canaria IFITM3 (GenBank: XM_009102512), and Nipponia nippon IFITM3 (GenBank: XM_009463652).
Prolonged bleeding from the bite of the Asian medicinal leech Hirudo nipponia. Comparative Haematology International 1999;9(3):125-31.
For example, protection of nesting areas helped the Asian crested ibis (Nipponia nippon) climb from "critically endangered" status in 1994 to being simply "endangered" in 2000.
Recent efforts to establish wild populations of the once locally extinct oriental stork (Ciconia boyciana) and crested ibis (Nipponia nippon) have been successful.
The Japanese crested ibis, known scientifically as Nipponia Nippon, was once found in various parts of Japan but became extinct in the wild in Japan in 2003.
Nipponia (www.jinjapan.org/nipponia) is an online magazine featuring interviews with young Japanese women, among them two Olympic swimming gold medalists and a master of the board game Go.
Though its scientific name is Nipponia Nippon, the birds are virtually extinct in Japan.
The species, known by the scientific name Nipponia nippon, has become extinct in the wild in Japan due to environmental degradation and hunting.