Crested Ibis

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Crested Ibis

 

(Nipponia nippori), a bird of the family Threskiornithidae of the order Ciconiiformes. Body length, 75–80 cm. It has a crest of long feathers on the occiput. In the winter the plumage is white with a pink bloom; in the summer the head, neck, and back are ashen gray. The facial parts of the head are bare and orange-red in color. The legs are brownish red, and the bill is black with a red tip. It is a dying species. Several dozen nest in Japan on Honshu and Sado islands. The colony of crested ibises on the Oki islands disappeared after 1920; it has nested in Korea and Northeast China. In the USSR the crested ibis is an extremely rare migratory bird; in the 19th century it nested in the southern Primor’e.

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Development of novel microsatellite loci and assessment of genetic diversity in the endangered Crested Ibis, Nipponia nippon.
Sex-related gene and sex identification of Crested Ibis Nipponia nippon (Ciconiiformes: Threskiornithidae).
Reproductive success of the Crested Ibis Nipponia nippon.
Though its scientific name is Nipponia Nippon, the birds are virtually extinct in Japan.
Wild ibises, whose scientific name is Nipponia Nippon, started disappearing in Japan in the 1980s due to hunting and destruction of their habitats.
The species, known by the scientific name Nipponia nippon, has become extinct in the wild in Japan due to environmental degradation and hunting.
The crested ibis, whose scientific name is Nipponia Nippon, is virtually extinct in Japan.
The academic name for crested ibises is Nipponia Nippon, containing the Japanese word for Japan.
Although its scientific name is Nipponia Nippon, the birds are virtually extinct in Japan due to the nation's failure to properly protect the bird in the past and environmental degradation.
The scientific name for crested ibises is Nipponia Nippon but the birds are virtually extinct in Japan.
Wild ibises, whose scientific name is Nipponia Nippon, began disappearing in Japan in the 1980s due to hunting and the destruction of their habitat.
The center, which is located in the village of Niibo on the island, has received ibises, whose scientific name is Nipponia Nippon, from China on two other occasions since 1985 but has been unable to breed them.