Nezib

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Nezib

(nē`zĭb), in the Bible, city, SW ancient Palestine, NW of Hebron.
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An only child of farmers in the area of Nisibis, he deserts his parents, who pressed him to marry, and becomes a monk in the desert of Chalcis.
Stevenson analyzes the stanzaic syntax in the Syriac madrase--metrical poetry divided into stanzas--by Ephrem of Nisibis (ca.
6) A conspicuous example of this is the comparison between the siege of Syene in Book 9 of the novel and the siege of Nisibis as described by the emperor Julian in his panegyrics for Constantius II (Or.
Using Persian and Roman names in inscriptions, is an indication of the relationship of that strong government by Arab emir that seems those relationships are more related to the peace between the Sassanid--After the war contract of Nisibis 298 AD--until the recent attacks against Arabs, Iranians have been led by Shapur II [10].
This cross-fertilization of influences from Greek, Semitic, Persian, and Indian sources were all present in the sixth-century school of Nisibis, and to some degree earlier in Edessa.
3) This call of love was also expressed in the words of the Nestorian Bishop of Nisibis in the 13th century:
Another figure of the early Church, Narsai of Nisibis (c.
After narrating the conversion of Najran in the fifth century through the evangelistic efforts of the merchant Hayyan, the chronicler refers to a slightly later period when a Jewish woman taken captive in Nisibis "was bought by a king of Yemen.
A Syriac translation appeared by the mid-fifth century, before the school of Edessa was expelled from the Empire in 489 and took refuge at Nisibis in Persia (2).
Former Walthamstow RM (now Harlow GM) Chris Page, a great friend of the Derby winning handler, is heading a syndicate that has purchased a pounds 10,000 yearling filly, by Statue Of Liberty out of Nisibis, to race out of the stables of horse trainer Julia Feilden.
Later it became Christian, while Nisibis (Nusaybin, also Kurdish today) was an important center of Judaism.
Ulteriores rivalidades entre los bizantinos y los sasanidas, los cuales apoyaron naturalmente todo movimiento cismatico contra los bizantinos, llevarian los centros de estudio de las iglesias orientales cada vez mas hacia el oriente, a Edessa y Nisibis, y, finalmente, hasta los limites del Imperio Persa.