Nezib

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Nezib

(nē`zĭb), in the Bible, city, SW ancient Palestine, NW of Hebron.
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Tradition and Innovation: Baptismal Rite and Mystagogy in Theodore of Mopsuestia and Narsai of Nisibis
Ephrem was born in Nisibis, Mesopotamia, (Nusaybin, Iraq) in about 306.
Se trata de la traduccion al castellano de algunos de los himnos de Efren de Siria, o Efren de Nisibis (su ciudad de origen), uno de los Padres mas relevantes del siglo IV y, al mismo tiempo, de los menos conocidos, sobre todo en el Occidente latino.
An only child of farmers in the area of Nisibis, he deserts his parents, who pressed him to marry, and becomes a monk in the desert of Chalcis.
Al-Hira was also the site of a Christian school, founded in the tradition of the schools of Edessa and Nisibis. (69) Church history had been written in the school of Nisibis since the start of the sixth century, and the southward spread of the East Syrian scholastic system may have also stimulated history-writing among the 'Ibad (as it had done in Ctesiphon).
(6) A conspicuous example of this is the comparison between the siege of Syene in Book 9 of the novel and the siege of Nisibis as described by the emperor Julian in his panegyrics for Constantius II (Or.
Using Persian and Roman names in inscriptions, is an indication of the relationship of that strong government by Arab emir that seems those relationships are more related to the peace between the Sassanid--After the war contract of Nisibis 298 AD--until the recent attacks against Arabs, Iranians have been led by Shapur II [10].
This cross-fertilization of influences from Greek, Semitic, Persian, and Indian sources were all present in the sixth-century school of Nisibis, and to some degree earlier in Edessa.
Luzbetak observed, "Christianity is by its very nature a faith of love (Mt 22:34-40; Jn 13:14f, 34; 15:9-17), whose adherents are to be recognized by their God-likeness that is reflected especially in their genuine care and active compassion for others." (3) This call of love was also expressed in the words of the Nestorian Bishop of Nisibis in the 13th century: The Gospel calls us to love.