Nitra

(redirected from Nitria)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Nitra

(nyĭ`trä), Ger. Neutra, Hung. Nyitra, city (1991 pop. 89,969), W Slovakia, on the Nitra River, a tributary of the Danube. It is an agricultural market center and has extensive food-processing industries. Dating from Roman times, Nitra was important from the 9th cent. onward as a religious center and fortress. It became a free city by royal decree in 1248 and was made a Roman Catholic bishopric in 1288. Nitra's bishopric church and a castle (founded c.830) are the oldest structures in Slovakia. The city also has an agricultural college.

Nitra

 

a city on the Nitra River in Czechoslovakia, in West Slovakia, the Slovak Socialist Republic. Population, 47,000 (1971). Industries include food processing and machine building.

Nitra is one of Slovakia’s most ancient cities. In the early Iron Age (800–500 B.C.), a large settlement surrounded by ramparts existed on the site of the modern city. With the arrival in the sixth and seventh centuries of the Slavs in the vicinity of the Danube, Nitra became an important political and cultural center of Slovakia. In the ninth century it was the capital of the Nitra Principality; the oldest church was built, and the first church diocese appeared. At this time, Nitra consisted of two large fortifications surrounded by double ramparts and by palisades. In the early tenth century, after the Magyar invasion, the city of Nitra became a separate principality. After liberation from the Magyars in the 13th century and restoration of the diocese, Nitra was for a long time a diocesan possession. Systematic excavations have been conducted since 1949.

REFERENCE

Nitra. Nitra, 1960.

Nitra

 

a river in Czechoslovakia, a left tributary of the Váh River of the Danube River basin. The Nitra is 242 km long and drains an area of 5,200 sq km. It rises on the southern slopes of the Malá Fatra Mountains of the Western Carpathians, and the lower course flows across the Central Danubian Plain. The mean flow rate in the lower course is approximately 25 cu m per sec. High water occurs in spring; the water is at its lowest level in summer. The river is used for floating timber. The city of Nitra is situated on the Nitra.

References in periodicals archive ?
425), who recounts his late fourth-century observations of desert monasticism in the Lausiac History, gives us a hint of what the private weekday evening Office might have been like at Nitria in Lower Egypt: 'one who stands there at about the ninth hour can hear the psalmody issuing forth from each cell, so that he imagines himself to be high above in paradise'.
The proportion of the place names in the Ethiopic Collectio matches that of the Greek Apophthegmata: Scetis appears most often (eighteen times), then Kellia (eight times), and finally Nitria (twice).
Evelyn White, The Monasteries of the Wadi `n Natrun, part 2, The History of the Monasteries of Nitria and of Scetis (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art Egyptian Expedition, 1932).
In the Alphabetical Collection, this saying is listed under the name of Amoun, the founder of Nitria (d.
13) According to Palladius, Macarius of Alexandria was alive for the first three years of his stay at Cellia (HL 18), and since his stay at Cellia followed a year on a mountain in Nitria (HL 7), and three years in the neighbourhood of Alexandria (HL 3), where he had originally arrived in 388 (HL 1), this Macarius seems to have died c.
The work ably demonstrates that the semianchoritic life of the monastic communities of Nitria and Scetis was flexible, allowing monks to live alone or with others and to meet regularly or rarely.
The first three names given by Jerome are those of three of the four famous Tall Brothers, the leaders of the Origenist monks of Nitria persecuted by Theophilus.
9) The sections on the other two monks named by Jerome occur at different points and are not connected with Nitria (II and XVII Latin).
Particularly striking is the fact that he agrees closely with Rufinus against the Greek in the accounts of Nitria and Cellia and in including the section on the monk Origenes, which has been omitted in the Greek (cf.
In 399/400, however, Theophilus of Alexandria quarrelled with the Origenist monks of Nitria, called an Egyptian synod to condemn Origen's errors, and communicated the result to the new pope, Anastasius, who followed suit.
Rufinus had received his theological training from admirers of Origen, Didymus the Blind and the monks of Nitria.