Nitrophyte

nitrophyte

[¦nī·trə‚fīt]
(botany)
A plant that requires nitrogen-rich soil for growth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nitrophyte

 

a plant that grows well only on soils that are rich in assimilable nitrogen compounds, primarily salts of nitric acid and ammonium. Nitrophytes grow in pastures, especially in places where livestock have been kept. They include many weeds (Agropyron, Chenopodium, Atriplex, and Amaranthus), plants that grow on garbage sites (Urtica, Hyoscyamus, Carduus, Leonurus, and Artemisia absinthium), and plants that grow at logging sites (fireweed, Rubus, and other plants that use the nitrogen-containing salts from decomposing forest litter and logging waste). Nitrophytes include valuable forage grasses and meadow weeds (Heracleum, Anthriscus, Veratrum). Many cultivated plants, such as wheat, flax, and sunflower, are nitrophytes. A number of lower plants, including some mosses, algae, fungi, and lichens, are nitrophilous.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.