Niven


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Niven

David. 1909--83, British film actor and author. His films include The Prisoner of Zenda (1937), Around the World in 80 Days (1956), Casino Royale (1967), and Paper Tiger (1975). He wrote the autobiographical The Moon's a Balloon (1972) and Bring on the Empty Horses (1975)
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the large number of books published on the Nazi film industry in general and on Adolf Hitler in particular, I was skeptical initially that Bill Niven's book, Hitler and Film, would offer anything more than a rehash of information available elsewhere, even if scattered.
In his new role based in London, Niven will oversee the continued expansion of Cowen's European-based sales and trading initiatives.
Fiscal depute Alison Herald told the court that Niven had left by the time police arrived.
1983 - David Niven, the veteran British actor and one of the screen's most durable leading men, has died in a Swiss hospital after a long illness.
Niven was the George Clooney of his day - dapper, debonair and deeply adored by a legion of female movie goers.
By the 1840s, Balfron was suffering a decline in fortunes and through Niven's authorship of the New Statistical Account for Balfron and his evidence to the Poor Law Enquiry Commission people today can glimpse a snapshot of the village at that time.
In the effort to bring an Olympics to Calgary, King and Niven had to overcome the reputation of the money-losing 1976 Summer Games in Montreal.
While sharing of indecent imagery had reduced by 75% since 2014, Mr Niven said offenders were becoming more sophisticated and also using technology to allow live streaming of abuse.
Niven treats her protagonists with admirable respect, tackling the issues that seem so big in high school with prose that dances on the line between seriousness and whimsy.
Niven, who feared the fast ground at York would go against his stable star (left), said: "I'm not saying it would have suited him, but it was safe."
In a 1987 interview with the Sydney Morning Herald, Hignett said that, despite his suave onscreen image, Niven was a ruthless wartime operator who took no prisoners.