Nizhyn


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Nizhyn

(nyĭzh`ĭn), Rus. Nezhin, city (1989 pop. 81,000), N Ukraine, on the Oster River. It is a rail terminus on the main Moscow-Kiev line and an agricultural trade center. Industries include engineering, food processing, and the manufacture of machinery and railroad cars. Known in the 11th cent., the city was the center of the Nizhyn Ukrainian Cossack regiment from 1649 to 1782. It became an important trading center in the 17th and 18th cent. after Greek merchants received permission to settle there in 1657.
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(59) In October 1668, the Archpriest of Nizhyn and one of the main supporters of the Muscovite cause, Symeon Adamovych, reported to the Posol'skii prikaz (the tsar's Foreign Office) that Tukal's'kyi was behind Hetman Briukhovets'kyi's rebellion and had received through the Patriarch of Constantinople the sultan's confirmation letter as Metropolitan of Kyiv, while Hetman Doroshenko listened only to Tukal's'kyi and had submitted to the sultan's authority because of Tukal's'kyi's advice.
Budilovich was also a "man from the borderlands." Originally from the province of Grodno, he was a professor at the Institute of Nizhyn in eastern Ukraine (1875-1881) and moved to Warsaw University in 1881.
In 2003 the government allocated more than $661,000 (3.5 million hryvnyas) for inventory and reconstruction of sacred buildings, including the Assumption Cathedral in Volodymyr Volynsky, Volyn' Oblast, Cathedral of the Protection of the Mother of God in Izmail, Odesa Oblast, Annunciation Cathedral in Nizhyn, the Transfiguration Cathedral in Novhord-Siverskiy, Chernihiv Oblast, and a monastery in Manyava, Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast.