Nobilitas

Nobilitas

 

an exclusive circle of patrician and distinguished plebeian families that arose in the Roman Republic toward the beginning of the third century B.C. Traditionally, the highest state offices were filled by members of the nobilitas, and their monopoly of the highest government posts made it almost impossible for a “new man” to hold the office of consul. The nobilitas preserved the political traditions of the aristocratic republic, but opposition politicians also came from this milieu. With rare exceptions, the leaders of the Roman “democrats” also belonged to the nobilitas. During the empire, the influence of the nobilitas declined. Ancient writers also used the term “nobilitas” in a broader sense to designate the aristocracy, as opposed to the “people” or the “mob.”

REFERENCES

Gelzer, M. Die Nobilität der Römischen Republik. Leipzig-Berlin, 1912.
Münzer, F. Römische Adelsparteien und Adelsfamilien. Stuttgart, 1920.
References in periodicals archive ?
See Yakobson (2006) 390, for the composition of the Roman elite and the real meaning of the term nobilitas, which did not include "a few aristocratic clans"; cf.
That is, it is highly unlikely that the old man referred to in the story could have been treated so had he been a member of the nobilitas or even the equites--since the procurator carrying out the task would then have been at best a social equal.
Does it mark the old-fashioned humanist respect for the vera nobilitas, the true and innate virtue that distinguishes individuals within hierarchical social structures?
Aliter est maior nobilitas et magnificentia sicut est in qualibet creatura quae posita est secundum suam nobilitatem in sibi convenienti loco, quia terra quae est minus nobilis est in infinio loco, aqua est super earn quia nobilior, et sic de singulis et etiam de spiritibus angelicis.
As time went on, more and more of the aristocracy became Christian, and a snowball became an avalanche as career preferment came to depend not only on shared ideals of honor, wealth, and nobilitas but also on shared Christianity.
Smith divides the broad category of "gentry" into two groups: nobilitas maior and nobilitas minor.
1970 "The doctrine of Vera Nobilitas as developed after Chaucer", Kwartalnik Neofilologiczny 17:119-127.
Book VIII of the Anticlaudianus tells how Fortuna and her daughter Nobilitas co-operate to endow the New Man with gifts (VIII.
O utinam potius nunquam pressisse furorem / nobilitas rabiemque tuam coepisset
THAT VIRGIN OF CHRIST WHO IS BOTH NOBLE AND RICH": NOBILITAS AND THE ANICIAN VIRGIN