Noble Savage


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Noble Savage

Chactas
the “noble savage” of the Natchez Indians; beloved of Atala. [Fr. Lit.: Atala]
Chingachgook
idealized noble Indian. [Am. Lit.: The Deers layer]
Daggoo
African savage and crew member of the Pequod. [Am. Lit.: Moby Dick]
noble savage
concept of a simple, pure, and superior man, uncorrupted by civilization. [Western Culture: Benét, 718–719]
Oroonoko
the noble savage enslaved; rebels against captors. [Br. Lit.: Oroonoko]
Queequeg
Polynesian prince and Ishmael’s comrade aboard whaling vessel, Pequod. [Am. Lit.: Moby Dick]
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: A collective work of impressively informed and informative scholarship, "Gambling on Authenticity: Gaming, the Noble Savage, and the Not-So-New Indian" illuminates the not-so-new Indian being formed in the public's consciousness by and through casino gaming.
His short fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, The Antioch Review, Mademoiselle, the Noble Savage and other publications.
Three of these, her debut cassette Tallinn at Dawn, the Noble Savage EP and an LP, Cabaret Cixious, are the fruits of playful, plodding laptop experiments that began in London while Juur was a summer intern at.
The bishop and the Marist priests who would soon follow him into the region were well read and strongly influenced by France's prevailing Romantic movement, with its emphasis on the noble savage and the emotive power of nature.
He said: "There was this colonialist idea of the noble savage which motivated the programme.
Seen through this post-colonial lens, The Theatre of Neptune in New France emerges as "an elaborate, small-scale spectacle of wishful imperial triumphalism," as "a snapshot of European strategies for imperial conquest," and as "Lescarbot's Franco-Christian imperialism and Noble Savage romanticism.
He points out that the early westerns depict Indians in the stereotypical fashion, moving from savage to noble savage.
Holmes's telling makes clear how fundamental the meeting was, as it shaped Western ideas of the noble savage and the adventurer-discoverer for centuries to come.
As far as the noble savage is concerned, that phrase is from Dryden and does not appear in Rousseau's writings.
his own, my noble savage, my dying Gaul, steady in his embrace of
Chateaubriand moved away from Rousseau's vision of the noble savage, seeing primitive people as sometimes childlike and evolving with changes in society.
Each and every one is either a bloodthirsty mindless killer and pillager or a childlike noble savage and feeble victim.