noble gas

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noble gas:

see inert gasinert gas
or noble gas,
any of the elements in Group 18 of the periodic table. In order of increasing atomic number they are: helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon. They are colorless, odorless, tasteless gases and were once believed to be entirely inert, i.e.
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noble gas

[′nō·bəl ′gas]
(chemistry)
A gas in group 0 of the periodic table of the elements; it is monatomic and, with limited exceptions, chemically inert. Also known as inert gas; rare gas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most existing models find that convection should have left the mantle extensively depleted in ancient noble gases, unless part or all of the lower mantle has been somehow isolated," said study co-author Helge Gonnermann, assistant professor of Earth science at Rice.
The team used a diamond-anvil cell to bring the noble gases helium, neon, argon, and xenon to more than 100,000 times the pressure of Earth's atmosphere (15-52 gigapascals), and used a laser to heat them to temperatures ranging up to 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit (about 28,000 degrees Kelvin).
And since the method that the researchers employed relies on the basic physics of the noble gases, it can be employed anywhere.
The discoveries were made with a new paleohydrogeology tool--developed by geologists Chen Zhu of Indiana University, Bloomington, and Rolf Kipfer of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology--that depends on the curious properties of noble gases as they seep through natural underground aquifers.
With actual applications such as aspects of hydrogen technology and the use of hydrogen in fuel cells as well, the contributors address logistics, the air gases of nitrogen, oxygen and argon, the noble gases of neon, krypton, xenon and helium, gases used in synthesis such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide, natural gas, fuel gases, and mixtures.
Klymit has developed a patent-pending, form of adjustable insulation technology, which utilizes inert, noble gases.
The noble gases krypton and xenon are indeed beta and gamma emitters.
Typical cover gases include nitrogen, non-combustible gases, noble gases and dehydrated air.
Most of this volume is made up of inert compounds and noble gases, so called because they don't react with their surroundings very much, if at all.
This offers qualitative justification of some experimental results obtained by BEUTLER in studies of absorption arc spectra of noble gases and [I.