Nobunaga


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Nobunaga

(Nobunaga Oda) (nōbo͞onä`gä ōdä`), 1534–82, Japanese military commander. The son of a daimyodaimyo
[Jap.,=great name], the great feudal landholders of Japan, the territorial barons as distinguished from the kuge, or court nobles. Great tax-free estates were built up from the 8th cent.
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, Nobunaga greatly expanded his father's holdings, becoming master of three provinces near present-day Nagoya. The emperor secretly appealed to him for help, and Nobunaga, acting in the emperor's name, became (1568) dictator of central Japan. Though he restored the ousted shōgun (Nobunaga's ancestry made him ineligible for the title), the real power was his and, aided by his general HideyoshiHideyoshi
(Hideyoshi Toyotomi) , 1536–98, Japanese warrior and dictator. He entered the service of Nobunaga as his sandal holder and rose to become his leading general. After Nobunaga's death Hideyoshi ruled as civilian dictator.
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 Toyotomi and his ally IeyasuIeyasu
(Ieyasu Tokugawa) , 1542–1616, Japanese warrior and dictator. A gifted leader and brilliant general, he founded the Tokugawa shogunate. Early in his career he helped Nobunaga and Hideyoshi unify Japan.
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, he unified all Japan except the extreme north and west. He broke the temporal power of the great Buddhist sects by destroying their armies. He was one of the first Japanese generals to supply his foot-soldiers with muskets. The early Jesuits in Japan gained Nobunaga's respect and, thereby, his permission to preach. Under his rule, free trade was encouraged and an era of castle building began. He was murdered by one of his discontented generals before the unification of all Japan, a task that was completed by Hideyoshi and Ieyasu.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tokugawa Ieyasu's own son was forced to commit seppuku (suicide) for failing his then lord Oda Nobunaga which partly inspired his reasons for abolishing the practice.
The feudal lord Oda Nobunaga (1534-82), for example, displayed expensive utensils at tea ceremonies to underscore his prowess.
If allowed an easy lead again, she could prove dangerous, while ex-chaser Nobunaga will be suited by this non-stayers track.
Among them was Oda Nobunaga (1534-82), who set the example for his successors by commissioning elaborate building projects and employing members of the Kano family to undertake the decoration of the castle interiors.
Si tenemos en cuenta una carta escrita en febrero de 1582 por el jesuita Gaspar Coelho, es probable que se tratase de aquellos que Oda Nobunaga "mandara fazer pelo mais insigne pintor que auia em Japao, e nelles mandou pintar esta cidade nova com a sua fortaleza [Castillo Azuchi] tanto al natural, que nada quis que discrepasse da verdade, pintando o sitio do lago, das casas, de tudo o mais quam proptiamente pudesse ser".
Sakai was the third person to have achieved "sennichi kaihogyo" twice since 16th-century warlord Oda Nobunaga destroyed the Enryaku temple in 1571.
THE MAIL'S TOP TIPS BATH 6.00 Aweebitowinker 6.30 Hand Grenade 7.00 Nateeja 7.30 Perfect Cracker 8.00 Whitefall 8.30 Perfect Outlook 9.00 Cara Gina BRIGHTON 2.15 Where's Reiley 2.45 Lesley's Choice 3.15 Apparently 3.45 Lightning Spirit 4.15 Spieta 4.45 Decent Fella 5.15 Lionheart HAMILTON 2.30 Morning Post 3.00 Lady Del Sol 3.30 Pertuis 4.00 Quick Wit 4.30 Pastoral Prey 5.00 Salvatore Fury 5.30 Rock Canyon STRATFORD 5.40 Collingwood 6.10 Ittirad 6.40 Castlemorris King 7.10 Nobunaga 7.40 The Fox's Decree 8.10 Prospect Wells 8.40 Slaney Star
Venetia Williams, trainer of Nobunaga "He burst a blood vessel last time but he still ran well.