Aulus Gellius

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Aulus Gellius:

see Gellius, AulusGellius, Aulus
, fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive).
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Gellius, Aulus

(jĕl`yəs), fl. 2d cent., Roman writer. He was a lawyer who spent at least a year in Athens and wrote Noctes Atticae [Attic nights], a collection of discussions of law, antiquities, and sundry other subjects in 20 books (of which 19 and a fraction survive). The work is chiefly valuable as a storehouse of quotations from lost works.
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper aims to explore some parallels and contrasts between two contemporary Latin texts, Gellius' Noctes Atticae and Apuleius' Metamorphoses, as forms of satirical self-display through ego-narrative.
Throughout this article I refer to Gellius' and Apuleius' literary selfdisplay as 'satirical self-fashioning', although neither Noctes Atticae nor Metamorphoses are works of Roman Satire in a strict sense.
Yet, regarding the genre of Satire in a strict sense, recent publications have demonstrated the significant presence of Roman verse satire and Menippean Satire in the Metamorphoses and the Noctes Atticae.
We can observe a similar development in scholarly approaches regarding the 'image' of Gellius: earlier, more positivistic approaches to the Noctes Atticae, while stereotyping its author as an unoriginal collector of information and uncritical admirer of the celebrities of the Second Sophistic (Favorinus, Herodes Atticus), have put most emphasis on questions of content and the thematic organisation of this content.
Against this background, I discuss some scenes from the Noctes Atticae and the Metamorphoses that show Gellius and Apuleius as being particularly close in their satirical techniques.
9) Since the 'envy' problem is a common topos of satiric writers, (10) the references to envy at the beginning of the Noctes Atticae and at the end of the Metamorphoses may perhaps be understood in a programmatic way, as 'satirical' self-construction gestures.
Gli archetipi sono le Noctes Atticae di Aulo Gellio e con esse tutta la tradizione delle "fiorite" medievali, delle raccolte di scholia umanistiche e infine della Silva de varia leccion di Pedro Mexia che ebbe in Italia un successo enorme.
134) The metaphor is used by Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 14.
Presumably Scaliger is alluding to the proverb "Nihil graculo cum fidibus" (Ignorant people have nothing to do with poetry), which is quoted by Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae, praefatio 19.
Like Aulus Gellius in Noctes Atticae, Mazzarella is an inveterate quoter of the texts of others, weaving her own reflections around them.
Gellius, widely popular in the Middle Ages, was also one of Erasmus's favorite authors; Erasmus drew anecdotes and quotations freely from the "charming" Noctes Atticae, [19] recommended it to teachers as a useful source of knowledge, [20] and ranked Gellius among "the great authors" whose style was worthy of imitation, along with Cicero, Livy, Quintilian, Apuleius, and Pliny.
The phrase echoes Gellius, Noctes Atticae 12, 1, 11 "in capessendis naturae sensibus tam obsurduit.