Noctis Labyrinthus


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Noctis Labyrinthus

(nok -tis) See Tharsis Ridge.
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Using satellite images, researchers spotted fields of ghost dunes pitting the surface of two different regions on Mars: 480 potential dune molds at Noctis Labyrinthus, a mazelike region of plateaus and canyons, and 300 in the Hellas Planitia, a smooth 4-billion-year-old crater.
The HRSC image runs from northwest to the southeast across the Tharsis region from the polar ice cap in the lower-left corner of the image, over the giant volcano Alba Mons, part of Olympus Mons, the Tharsis volcanoes Ascraeus Mons and Pavonis Mons shown as dark patches above the cloud cover and finally across the net-like Noctis Labyrinthus and the valley system of Valles Marineris, with its characteristic dark-coloured deposits in the top left-hand corner of the image.
24, 2015 by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, shows the western side of an elongated pit depression in the eastern Noctis Labyrinthus region of Mars.
The jarosite-bearing deposit observed here could indicate acidic aqueous conditions within a volcanic system in Noctis Labyrinthus. Above the light-toned jarosite deposit is a mantle of finely layered darker-toned material.
He identifies the volcanic region of Tharsis as the source region of the lava flows and from there initial lava tubes stretched to the edge of the Noctis Labyrinthus. When the pressure from an eruption subsided, some of the tube ceilings collapsed, leading to the formation of a chain of almost circular holes, the 'pit chains'.
Tithonius Lacus encompasses the features that are now designated Tithonium Chasma and Noctis Labyrinthus. It was revealed by the Mariner 9 mission of 1971 to be an immense, branching canyon system that measures as much as a staggering 6 kilometers deep, one of the western arms of the globe-girdling trough known as Valles Marineris.
The minerals were found inside two small depressions in a region of the planet known as Noctis Labyrinthus.
"We discovered locations at Noctis Labyrinthus that show many kinds of minerals that formed by water activity," said lead author Catherine Weitz, senior scientist at the Planetary Science Institute.
Catherine Weitz, a senior scientist at the Tucson-based Planetary Science Institute, and her colleagues studied light-toned deposits (LTDs) within troughs of the Noctis Labyrinthus region in western Valles Marineris using data gathered by three Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) instruments.