Nominative Construction

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nominative Construction

 

a model of a sentence, which is common to many languages, including the Indo-European, Uralic, and Turkic.

The characteristic morphological correlates (interrelated units) of a nominative construction are the nominative case of the subject, the subject conjugation of the predicate verb, and the accusative case of the direct object. The construction is organized by all verbs regardless of their transitivity or intransitivity. However, only transitive verbs can distinguish two variants of the construction: active and passive (for example, “the workers are building the factory” and “the factory is being built by the workers”).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nominative construction known both in Finnish and Estonian (Kastike tuli suolainen 'The sauce became salty') is an exception to the complex system of case variation in BECOME-constructions.
(9) the nominative construction is a more direct loan from the Germanic languages, and Estonian has adopted this loan construction more fully.
In Estonian the nominative construction can also be used, but in Modern Finnish the nominative contruction is not available; grammars describe it as 'archaic'.
If the patient of a transitive verb that also has an agent shows specific marking, then it is the same as what is called object or accusative in a nominative construction. We shall return later to a discussion of the important fact that triadic languages have objects in the same sense and the same way as nominative languages have; but we note here that for the other two case forms we must give up the use of the previously introduced terms.
Without going into details, let me observe that the crucial aspect of the predicate nominative constructions in (3a, b) resides in profiling the identity relation between an instance (of the relevant subtype) which functions as the trajector (cf.
And for more on the predicate nominative constructions see Langacker (1991: 64-71).