Nomograph


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

nomograph

[′näm·ə‚graf]
(mathematics)
A chart which represents an equation containing three variables by means of three scales so that a straight line cuts the three scales in values of the three variables satisfying the equation. Also known as abac; alignment chart; nomogram.

Nomograph

 

(also nomogram), a particular kind of graphic functional relation. The nomograph is used primarily as a means of computation, as a device for making specific calculations in, for example, engineering.

References in periodicals archive ?
The nomographs presented here illustrate that the participant is better off after taxes to estimate S, the designated amount, higher under uncertainty.
The area of focus changes to examine heating time and heater temperature, the same heat transfer parameters used in the nomographs, as compared with heat flux.
Table 4 shows the recommended speed of each curve based on the ball-bank indicator criteria and nomograph in the TCDH, which is based on the standard curve speed formula with a friction factor of 0.
For soils containing [is less than] 70% silt plus very fine sand, the nomograph of Wischmeier et al.
Most EW operators are familiar with the set of equations and linear nomographs that describe the line-of-sight between a radar and a target.
This unusual nomograph allows the design engineer to predict the ratio of effective radiated power (ERP) of an on-board jammer to a decoy jammer.
As illustrated in the figure, graph paper used for this purpose often contains a nomograph on the righthand side of the chart and a "bull's eye" pattern nearby.
Wischmeier and Smith (USDA 1978) proposed using silt plus very fine sand content as the first parameter in a nomograph to estimate a soil erodibility parameter for the USLE.
K factor values were estimated with the Wischmeier and Smith (1978) nomograph using the four soil properties of texture, organic matter content, structure, and permeability collected at 18 LCTA transects with three locations on each transect (n = 54).
For many soils in the USA, K values may be estimated through either an equation or its corresponding nomograph (Wischmeier and Smith 1978; Renard et al.
1983) indicated that the nomograph method (Wischmeier and Smith, 1978) provides satisfactory estimates of soil erodibility for mining, construction, and reclamation lands.
Alternative nomograph equations have been proposed, but there can be little certainty which equation would be best suited to Australian (or other) soils and conditions.