Non-Uniform Memory Access


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Non-Uniform Memory Access

(architecture)
(NUMA) A memory architecture, used in multiprocessors, where the access time depends on the memory location. A processor can access its own local memory faster than non-local memory (memory which is local to another processor or shared between processors).
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
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Today, both Intel and AMD use the non-uniform memory access (NUMA) architecture in the multiple CPU chipset to achieve the best performance at a relatively low price.
A good answer appears to be non-uniform memory access (NUMA) architectures coupled with multiple processor-to-processor and processor-to-memory communications channels.
The NAG SMP Library, recently updated to Mark 21, which is used by some of the world's most prestigious supercomputing centers was produced to enable developers and programmers to make optimal use of the processing power and shared memory parallelism of Symmetric Multi-Processor (SMP) or cache-coherent non-uniform memory access (ccNUMA) systems.
These distributed shared memory systems are based on the company's NUMA 3 architecture, a third-generation non-uniform memory access technology.
Finally, Belluzzo said that SGI will help develop Linux to the point where it supports ccNUMA (non-uniform memory access).
The Advanced Computing Technology Laboratory at PNNL hosts a range of architectures such as the 128-processor SGI Altix with scalable non-uniform memory access shared memory.
The new eServer x430, a 64-way server with the new Intel 900 MHz (2) Pentium(R) III Xeon(TM) processor, offers industry leading Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) architecture and I/O technologies.
Processor performance will continue to evolve at the historical 30%-35% per year rate and make its gains through more appealing SMP (Symmetrical Multi-Processor) and NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory Access) architectures.

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