nondurable goods

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nondurable goods

[‚nän¦du̇r·ə·bəl ′gu̇dz]
(engineering)
Products that are serviceable for a comparatively short time or are consumed or destroyed in a single usage.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, we have analysed the intertemporal behaviour in consumption, using quarterly and disaggregated data on five non-durable goods for Turkey.
Sales of non-durable goods gained upward momentum during 2003 and modest growth in demand should persist throughout 2004.
People spend on both goods and services, and goods are further broken down into durable goods, such as cars and furniture, and non-durable goods like food and clothing (although the government clearly has not looked in my closet if they consider clothing to be non-durable, I think I still have some stuff that dates from the Reagan Administration).
A growth was registered only in the group of intermediate products, except energy, of only one percent, and in the group of non-durable goods for general consumption of 1.
At non-durable goods makers, such as Procter & Gamble (NYSE: PG) productivity growth was lower, but still very respectable at 2.
Employers in construction plan to reduce staffing levels, while hiring in durable and non-durable goods manufacturing, finance/insurance/ real estate, education and public administration is expected to remain unchanged.
In Linneman's view, the increase in demand for durable and non-durable goods and the renewed investment in equipment and software are also positive factors.
Demographic and economic factors will boost demand for non-durable goods in both the short and long term.
In 2004, household expenditure on non-durable goods should rise slightly, but year-on-year gains are not likely to exceed 2.
Retail sales will also get a boost from increased sales of semi-durable and non-durable goods.
Growth in household purchases of non-durable goods in the range of 3 to 5 percent will primarily be driven by demographic factors.
An expanding service sector fostered diversification in the regional economy, reducing its historical dependence on non-durable goods manufacturing.