Nonconformist


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Nonconformist

a member of a Protestant denomination that dissents from an Established Church, esp the Church of England
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University The Dodge Collection of Soviet Nonconformist Art Promised Gift: More than 17,300 works 20th century
Another statue in Bala remembers leading nonconformist theologian, Thomas Charles, whose pupils took the gospel to every continent.
Almost the entire book is devoted to photography; there is very little text, and the striking, nonconformist outfits speak for themselves.
"I think that's where your nonconformist pedestrians are coming in.
co-mingle with Nonconformist mistrust of older religious traditions and
Thus, in contrast to earlier studies in this field-many of which focused on conflicts between African Christians and the colonial state and/or nation-building processes in postcolonial Africa - Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival looks at the confrontation between nonconformist religionists and a diverse set of African political entrepreneurs in the years before and after political independence.
Washington, June 2( ANI ): An Iranian nonconformist has been reportedly executed by hanging for 'enmity against God' despite protests by human rights groups.
The British dissenting tradition, embracing a multitude of Nonconformist denominations and sects of nearly endless variety, along with a "low church" strain of Anglicanism, is manifest across the spectrum of his writings in a veritable potpourri of allusions.
Schooled by his gifted father till he was eighteen, Henry went on to study at a Nonconformist academy in Islington, then a village near London.
She considers nonconformist Anglican hymns of the 18th century, how racial equality was asserted in sacred verse, the debate over the humanity of blacks and natives, legitimating the Emancipation of Africans in America, how hymns made space for natives and Africans in fiction, and more.
Nevertheless, as the years passed, toleration, at least of nonconformist Protestants, became progressively real in practice.
It was build by RC Hussey in 1850 through the generosity of Charles Bowyer Adderley, the first Baron Norton and Mr Joseph Wright a nonconformist, founder of the Railway Carriage Works in 1844, who contributed PS500.