nonpoint source

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nonpoint source

[‚nän′pȯint ‚sȯrs]
(civil engineering)
A dispersed source of stormwater runoff; the water comes from land dedicated to uses such as agriculture, development, forest, and land fills and enters the surface water system as sheet flow at irregular rates.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 kilometers (km); (ii) construction of 2,856 small-scale wastewater treatment facilities for rural villages in 10 townships, and associated sewer pipes of about 330 km; (iii) procurement of solid waste collection and compaction equipment, and seven transfer facilities; and (iv) development of nonpoint source pollution management, including soil test and green fertilizer application; and green pest control measures application in 5,690 hectares (ha) of farmland.
Pollution is often classed as point source or nonpoint source pollution.
In 1994, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized pet waste as a major contributor of Nonpoint Source Pollution (NPS) and as such, the runoff from pet waste will continue to produce harmful effects on our drinking water supply, recreation, fisheries and wildlife unless we all work together in our communities to reduce and prevent this pollution from occurring.
These projects will reduce nonpoint source pollution in impaired streams by implementing agricultural and stormwater best management practices (BMPs); developing, repairing or installing passive systems to treat AMD; and supporting the establishment of riparian buffers, among other methods.
The nonprofit Manchaug Pond Foundation announced recently it had received a "Section 319'' nonpoint source pollution grant totaling $208,525, according to Vice President Marty Jo Henry.
The stressors are broken down into seven categories which include changes to aquatic habitat, climate change, coastal development, fisheries management, invasive species, nonpoint source pollution and toxic chemical pollution.
Performance-Based Voluntary Group Contracts for Nonpoint Source Pollution.
More recently, the impacts of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen demand, microbial species, and other components of nonpoint source pollution have attracted attention.
Unlike pollution that comes from specific industrial factories, sewage treatment plants and other easily discernible 'points', nonpoint source pollution comes from many diffuse sources, but in the aggregate creates a formidable challenge for municipal, state and federal environmental and water control authorities.
Nonpoint source pollution generally results from land runoff, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, or percolation rather than from a discharge at a specific, single location.
The statute's failure to perform even more admirably than it has is due largely to a lack of legislative clarity in addressing the role of wetlands in preserving the integrity of aquatic ecosystems and to Congress's unwillingness to adopt, or force the states to adopt, measures to control nonpoint source pollution.