nonrelativistic


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nonrelativistic

(non-rel-ă-tă-viss -tik) Describing any phenomenon, object, etc., for which the effects of general or special relativity can be disregarded or do not apply.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lifshitz and Landau [2] or Fock [3]) contains two true local conservation equations of the form found in the nonrelativistic example of Section 2 and why one may identify the density and flux in these two equations as those of energy and spatial momentum, respectively.
37] we write the expression for the time that the universe expands from a maximal density to a minimal density dominance and is determined by the stage of the nonrelativistic matter dominance to be
We numerically studied the Cherenkov optical emission by a nonrelativistic modulated source crossing 3D dispersive metamaterial.
In the nonrelativistic case (v [much less than] c) and a weak potential field the relation (1) is reduced to the nonrelativistic approximation of the Hamiltonian in an alpha field:
Galilean spacetime plays the same role in nonrelativistic physics that Minkowski space-time does in relativistic physics.
The total energy loss of a nonrelativistic particle passing through plasma may be quantized in units of h[[omega].
Intended for undergraduate students who have previously taken introductory courses in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and special relativity, this textbook by Martin (physics and astronomy, U.
Here the object is to give some nonrelativistic basis for values that would have implications for social policy.
My reassessment of the question of humanism will involve the development of a conception of critical pluralism, a nonrelativistic but hermeneutic version of critical rationality.
So, the systems considered are treated by nonrelativistic mechanics.
However, in doing so, they unnoticeably developed nonrelativistic hermeneutics, in the sense that their epistemology of social sciences was at the same time a way of providing a universal meaning to social phenomena, which precisely for being subjective might be misinterpreted as arbitrary by other paradigms (i.
Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, and nonrelativistic quantum mechanics have survived and find much use today.