Borlaug, Norman Ernest

(redirected from Norman Borlaug)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Borlaug, Norman Ernest

(bôr`lôg), 1914–2009, U.S. agronomist, b. near Saude, Iowa, grad. Univ. of Minn. (Ph.D., 1942). He worked as researcher with the E. I. du Pont Company until 1944, when he joined the Rockefeller Foundation in Mexico. He became a director at the foundation and headed a team of scientists from 17 nations working to develop improved of grain harvests. The work Borlaug led or inspired resulted in the Green RevolutionGreen Revolution,
term referring mainly to dramatic increases in cereal-grain yields in many developing countries beginning in the late 1960s, due largely to use of genetically improved varieties. Beginning in the mid-1940s in Mexico researchers led by American Norman E.
..... Click the link for more information.
, which involved the use of improved wheat seed, new types of higher-yield rice, and more efficient use of fertilizer and water to produce larger food crop yields in many of the less-developed countries of South and Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Borlaug is credited with Mexico's self-sufficiency in wheat production, and in 1970 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to eradicate hunger and build international prosperity. He founded (1986) the World Food Prize to recognize contributions to fields involved in the world food supply. Borlaug was a professor at Texas A&M Univ. from 1984 until his death.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For 31 years, the World Food Prize has worked to build on the legacy of Norman Borlaug, "the man who saved a billion lives," by recognizing the achievements of individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity, and availability of food in the world.
Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application, endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation.
Because of Norman Borlaug's success in Mexico, these new farming techniques and hardier crop varieties spread globally and the Green Revolution was born.
In the 1960s, when biologist Paul Ehrlich was predicting mass starvation due to rapid population growth, plant breeder Norman Borlaug was developing the new crops and approaches to agriculture that would become mainstays of the Green Revolution.
"By understanding history we see the future; these rooms will honor that history and inspire future generations of scholars to end hunger," he continued, referencing past students, including renowned agronomy scientists Norman Borlaug and E.C.
The Center for Coffee Research and Education, located at the university's Norman Borlaug Institute for International Agriculture, will seek to make rapid gains in research to sustain and grow the world's coffee supply.
Soil scientist and former Ethiopian Agriculture Minister Professor Tekalign Mamo was announced as the winner of the Norman Borlaug Award for 2016 during the opening ceremony.
Bourne also profiles the forgotten hero of the Green Revolution, scientist Norman Borlaug, who developed many of the seeds and techniques that fueled the agricultural revolution.
Nobel Prize-winning plant breeder and father of Green Revolution Norman Borlaug supported organic farming in respect to environment friendly practice.
The story of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research begins with Norman Borlaug, son of a Wisconsin farmer, who received his Ph.D.
Norman Borlaug, recordado genetista de plantas e investigador del CIMMYT, quien recibio el Premio Nobel por sus contribuciones a la Revolucion Verde, el poder ver materializados los avances de la revolucion genomica en torno a la produccion de alimentos.
In the 1940s, Norman Borlaug, an American agronomist, with support from the Rockefeller and Ford Foundations and in collaboration with scientists from seventeen nations, began experiments to produce varieties of disease-resistant wheat in Mexico.