Norman French


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Norman French

the medieval Norman and English dialect of Old French
References in periodicals archive ?
Ron Groves, above left and below, gets ready for the big day with Brian Owens, Norman French and Andy Woolaston.
So the royal houses in the provinces never got closure in the minds of the populace because their dictatorships succumbed to market forces, namely the strength and power of the royal houses imposed on the Anglo-Saxon British by the Norman French.
Its name is believed to be derived from the Norman French word for armourer.
Based in the Vale of Belvoir (pronounced 'beaver' but a derivative of Norman French meaning 'beautiful view'), it was opened in 1955 as a venue for the Belvoir Hunt's point-to-point.
These Anglo-French and underlying Norman French terms are allied with the common Old French form breu 'soup' completed by the diminutive suffix--et.
who keeps the general reader in mind, sets out here to describe how Latin developed into the Romance languages, in particular Italian, French, and Spanish and how; through Norman French, it started to infiltrate English.
Contributors identified only by name explore the use of vernacular English during the period, especially in the areas of religion--instead of Latin--and government--instead of Norman French.
Look more closely at the map and you can see how the Welsh border was constantly changing, as the Norman French pushed into Wales, and were beaten back by angry Welsh.
In time, although French remained the official language of our country, the two languages mingled and it is this combination of Anglo-Saxon and Norman French which makes English such a rich language.
Keeping low through the bocage country [a Norman French mix of woods, pastures, and fields divided by hedgerows], he heard a loud clicking noise behind him, turned, and began running just as a German machine-gunner opened fire on him.
The effect of this settlement created a society which was trilingual - Norman French, English and Welsh.
Thus, the story of England is not the story of the Celtic migrations, the Roman conquest, or of the Germanic migrations, or the Danish invasion, or the Norman French conquest.