North Korea Victory Day

North Korea Victory Day

July 27
Victory Day marks the end of the Korean War, the three-year conflict between North Korea (official name: Democratic People's Republic of Korea), which was backed by the U.S.S.R. and China, and South Korea (official name: Republic of Korea), which was supported by the United Nations and United States. On July 27, 1953, the opponents signed an armistice that formally ended the war. The document ended overt hostilities, but it was not a permanent peace treaty between the nations. North and South Korea remain separate entities and occupy essentially the same territory they did when the war began. The border zone known as the demilitarized zone (DMZ) is heavily guarded on both sides, including almost 40,000 U.S. troops on the south side. Today, North Korea (official name: Democratic People's Republic of Korea) is a Communist country with a repressive government.
Victory Day is a public holiday observed throughout North Korea. Officials and citizens mark the occasion by laying wreaths and flowers at military cemeteries and monuments nationwide. In the capital city, Pyongyang, public celebrations can include displays by military personnel, dance performances, and youth oratorical events. In addition, officials take part in public wreath- and flower-laying ceremonies at national monuments in the city.
CONTACTS:
Permanent Representative of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the United Nations
820 Second Ave.
New York, NY 10017
212-972-3105; fax: 212-972-3154
www.korea-dpr.com
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