Northern Urals

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Northern Urals

 

the part of the Ural Mountains between the latitudinal section of the Shugor River in the north and Mount Oslianka in the south. The Northern Urals are approximately 550 km long and between 150 and 200 km wide; elevations generally range from 800 to 1,200 m, with a maximum elevation of 1,617 m at Mount Tel’posiz. The higher, axial portion of the mountains is composed of schists, quartzites, and quartz sandstones with intrusions of gabbros and peridotites. Sedimentary rocks predominate on the western slopes, and sedimentary and volcanogenic rocks on the eastern slopes. Many of the ridges have flattened peaks with rocky outliers. On the slopes are forests of spruce, fir, larch, and, more rarely, pine and cedar; above 700–800 m are mountain tundras and rock streams.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the woodlands of mountain forest and subalpine zones of the Northern Urals the lichen inhabits almost exclusively the old trunks of tall mountain ashes.
According to the Komsomolskaya Pravda daily, the search area included the mythical Dyatlov pass in the northern Urals where a group of students disappeared on an expedition in 1959 in a mystery that has never been solved.
At the foothills of the Northern Urals, fir, spruce, and mountain pine forest grow.
The mine site is near the crest of the Subpolar Urals (a range connecting the Polar Urals to the north and the Northern Urals on the south).

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