Northern Wei


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Northern Wei

 

(also T’opa Wei, Yüan Wei), a dynasty that ruled in North China from 386 to 535. The Northern Wei dynasty was founded by T’opa Kuei, the leader of the T’opa tribes that conquered North China in the fourth century. The period of its rule saw the spread of Buddhism through North China. The T’opa became highly sinicized and for the most part lost their own customs and language. In 534–35, in the course of internecine feudal strife and an antifeudal peasant struggle, the state split into two kingdoms, those of the Eastern Wei (534–550) and the Western Wei (535–557).

References in periodicals archive ?
530), a major rebel leader, likely of Xiongnu ancestry, in northern China in the declining years of the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-556).
We invite readers to create their own versions of the images dating back to the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-557) and Tang Dynasty (618-907)," said Yu.
The topics include evaluating biological materials for the functional reconstruction of ligament defects in exercise-induced ligament injury, effects of wall roughness and flow velocity on a water hammer, architectural materials in the Lu Gardens of the Northern Wei Dynasty, information retrieval in the design and application of a database for breeding farmed tilapia, and assessing elevator risk with a fuzzy analytic hierarchy process and artificial neural network model.
10) For over a century, north China was plunged into a period of chaos called the Sixteen Kingdoms (301-439), until a subgroup of Xianbei known as the Tuoba ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) succeeded in reunifying most of north China under a Chinese-style imperial dynasty called Northern Wei (386-534).
The catalogue also documents two collections of fragments of stone Buddha sculptures the artist amassed in 2003 titled "Hands" and "Feet" from the Northern Wei and Northern Qi Dynasty displayed on thick blocks of wood, poetic and understated.
The ancient Datong City Wall was built of clay by the Northern Wei Dynasty (AD 386-534).
Among these, the Northern Wei dynasty (386-534 AD) distinguished itself by promoting Buddhism as the official religion.
Film is set in the Northern Wei dynasty, during the fifth century, when Mongol hordes in the north--specifically the Rouran tribes--are eyeing the fertile plains of China as a place to settle full time.
In his early research, Soper (1960) suggested that the southern cave temples at both Qixia and Shicheng, while badly damaged, "are likely to have been directly inspired by the Northern Wei feats at Yun-kang [Yungang]" (50).
In the 4th century, non-Chinese north-Asian people known as the Xianbei seized control of northern China, establishing the Northern Wei dynasty (386-534) and promoting Buddhism as their official religion.
The more than 2,000 grottoes, located in Henan Province, contain about 110,000 Buddhist sculptures over a period of 400 years from the late period of the Northern Wei Dynasty to the Tang Dynasty (493-907).

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