Northern Wei

(redirected from Northern Wei dynasty)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Northern Wei

 

(also T’opa Wei, Yüan Wei), a dynasty that ruled in North China from 386 to 535. The Northern Wei dynasty was founded by T’opa Kuei, the leader of the T’opa tribes that conquered North China in the fourth century. The period of its rule saw the spread of Buddhism through North China. The T’opa became highly sinicized and for the most part lost their own customs and language. In 534–35, in the course of internecine feudal strife and an antifeudal peasant struggle, the state split into two kingdoms, those of the Eastern Wei (534–550) and the Western Wei (535–557).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(11) Earlier, as recorded in Wei shu [phrase omitted], the official history of the Northern Wei dynasty founded by the formerly nomadic group Tuoba [phrase omitted], a literati courtier Jiang Shi [phrase omitted] in a memorial to the throne in 514, while carefully inserting a positive spin on the phenomenon, bitterly complained that many newly coined popular characters, dismissed as "vulgar characters" (suzi [phrase omitted]) by Yan Zhitui, violated the orthography set by "ancient Confucian classics, (12) the great zhuan [phrase omitted] script of Shi Zhou [phrase omitted], the Shuowen [phrase omitted] dictionary by Xu Shen [phrase omitted], and the Stone Canon [phrase omitted]." (13)
'This was so out of our normal sphere,' Chip says with a laugh, 'but to me it is like a painting on stone but made with carved and incised lines.' Indeed, the panels derive from painted scenes that would have been placed around a couch during the 6th century (some red pigment and gilding remains), just as the bed itself would have followed existing domestic forms found during the latter part of the Northern Wei dynasty (386-534/5).
We invite readers to create their own versions of the images dating back to the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-557) and Tang Dynasty (618-907)," said Yu.
The topics include evaluating biological materials for the functional reconstruction of ligament defects in exercise-induced ligament injury, effects of wall roughness and flow velocity on a water hammer, architectural materials in the Lu Gardens of the Northern Wei Dynasty, information retrieval in the design and application of a database for breeding farmed tilapia, and assessing elevator risk with a fuzzy analytic hierarchy process and artificial neural network model.
(19) His grandfather, however, had been punished for committing some infraction with exile to a garrison at the top of the great northward loop of the Yellow River, on the north-central frontier of what was then the Northern Wei dynasty. By Gao Huan's time, after three generations on this frontier, the family had become culturally almost indistinguishable from the predominantly non-Chinese Xianbei population of the region.
Both Wei Shu [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which is a history book of the Northern Wei Dynasty written by the Northern Qi writer Wei Shou [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (507-572), and the Northern History [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which is a history book of all the Northern Dynasties written by a Tang Dynasty (618-907) historian Li Yanshou [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (year of birth and death unknown), have the records of a case of netherworld marriage which involves a princess of the Northern Wei and a young son of a minister.
She lived 1,500 years ago in a time known as the Northern Wei Dynasty. Her name is a bye-word for loyalty, devotion and bravery.
Among these, the Northern Wei dynasty (386-534 AD) distinguished itself by promoting Buddhism as the official religion.
Film is set in the Northern Wei dynasty, during the fifth century, when Mongol hordes in the north--specifically the Rouran tribes--are eyeing the fertile plains of China as a place to settle full time.
The more than 2,000 grottoes, located in Henan Province, contain about 110,000 Buddhist sculptures over a period of 400 years from the late period of the Northern Wei Dynasty to the Tang Dynasty (493-907).
Buddhism had gained great prominence in northern China by the fourth century A.D., when the Xianbei people founded the Northern Wei dynasty (386-534).

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