Norwich

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Norwich

(nôr`ĭj, –ĭch), city (1991 pop. 32,664) and district, county seat of Norfolk, E England, on the Wensum River just above its confluence with the Yare. Norwich is a principal city market for cattle and grain. It is also a center for shopping and entertainment, as well as administration. Since the 11th cent., Norwich has been a leading provincial city. It was sacked by the Danes in the 11th cent. and scourged by the Black Death in 1348. Norwich was the scene of events in Wat TylerTyler, Wat,
d. 1381, English rebel. His given name appears in full as Walter; his surname signifies the trade of a roof tiler. He came into prominence as the leader of the rebellion of 1381, known as the Peasants' Revolt.
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's rebellion of 1381 and in the uprising under Robert KettKett or Ket, Robert,
d. 1549, English rebel. He led an agrarian revolt in 1549 as a protest against the enclosure of common land for sheep grazing. With 16,000 men he blockaded Norwich, but was defeated and executed.
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 in 1549. There are many medieval churches as well as a cathedral founded in 1096 by the first bishop of Norwich. Norwich Castle, part of which dates from Norman times, was made (1894) into a museum for collections of natural history and local antiquities. It also houses paintings of the 18th- and 19th-century Norwich school of artists. Other old buildings include St. Giles's Hospital (13th cent.), Suckling House (14th cent.), Strangers Hall (15th cent.; now a museum), the guildhall (15th cent.), and St. Andrew's Hall (15th cent.; formerly a Dominican church). The Maddermarket Theatre, a reconstruction of a Shakespearean theater, has a permanent amateur company. The Norwich grammar school dates from the 13th cent. The city is also the cultural center of the county; triennial music festivals have been held there since 1824. It is seat of the Univ. of East Anglia (1963). The writer Harriet MartineauMartineau, Harriet
, 1802–76, English author. A journalist rather than a writer of literature, she was an enormously popular author. Her success is the more remarkable since she was deaf from childhood and the victim of various other illnesses throughout her life.
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 was born in Norwich.

Norwich

(nôr`wĭch, –ĭch), industrial city (1990 pop. 37,391), SE Conn., seat of New London co., on hilly ground, where the Yantic and Shetucket form the Thames; settled 1659, inc. 1784, town and city consolidated 1952. Chemicals, plastics, and paper products are manufactured. The last great battle between the Mohegans and Narragansetts took place on the site in 1643, and the tribal chiefs are buried there. Norwich was a leading colonial industrial city; Thomas Danforth began making pewterware there in 1733. The many historic structures include the Leffingwell Inn (1675); the birthplace and home of Benedict ArnoldArnold, Benedict,
1741–1801, American Revolutionary general and traitor, b. Norwich, Conn. As a youth he served for a time in the colonial militia in the French and Indian Wars. He later became a prosperous merchant.
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; and the home of Samuel HuntingtonHuntington, Samuel,
1731–96, political leader in the American Revolution, signer of the Declaration of Independence, b. Windham, Conn. He was a delegate (1775–84) to and president (1779–81) of the Continental Congress before serving as governor of Connecticut
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. The Mohegan Sun casino is in neighboring Uncasville.

Norwich

 

a city in Great Britain, on the Wensham River. Administrative center of the county of Norfolk; population, 121,700 (1971). Norwich is a major center for the leather and shoe industries. The machine-building industry is also developed.

Norwich arose on the site of Saxon settlements and a Roman city. A castle (c. 1135–54) dominates the old part, or center, of the city. Also situated in Norwich is the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, which is distinguished by a Romanesque nave (1096–1145) with a late-15th-century Gothic arch and by Gothic cloisters (1297–1325). There are remains of city walls from the late 13th and mid-14th centuries. The wall around the cathedral includes St. Aethelberht’s Gate (1316) and Erpingham Gate (1420). Modern buildings in Norwich include the university (3 km from the city; built in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s; architect, D. Lasdun) and a public library (1963; architect, D. Percival).

REFERENCE

Stephen, G. A., ed. Guide to Study of Norwich, 2nd ed. Norwich, 1919.

Norwich

a city in E England, administrative centre of Norfolk: cathedral (founded 1096); University of East Anglia (1963); traditionally a centre of the footwear industry, now has engineering, financial services. Pop.: 174 047 (2001)
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The victim, from Norwich, Norfolk, had asked the men for directions just before she was attacked.
Williams Way, Thorpe St Andrew, Norwich, Norfolk, NR7 OAW, UK.
He was born on October 19, 1946, in Norwich, Norfolk, England, the son of a Royal Air Force pilot.
The Final stages of construction of the Bradman Lake Group's brand new facility in Norwich, Norfolk are nearing completion and mark a new and exciting development for the global packaging technology specialist.
For further information contact AEW Delford at Pinetrees Road, Norwich, Norfolk NR15 1NB, UK; telephone: +44 1603-700755; e-mail: t.
Franchise House, 56 Surrey Street, Norwich, Norfolk, NR1 3FD United Kingdom
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Alice Knight lived six "happy" years at Flordon House in Norwich, Norfolk, until it shut a month ago.
The youngsters were found in the vehicle on a housing estate in Norwich, Norfolk, yesterday afternoon, police said.
My contact details are: SJ Snelling, 81 Beechwood Drive, Thorpe St Andrew, Norwich, Norfolk NR7 0LN.
Melanie Miller Norwich, Norfolk Your special bottle is likely to have been sold at a charity auction originally, probably for several hundred pounds, so yes, it is quite valuable today.