Notch signaling

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Notch signaling

[′näch ‚sig·nəl·iŋ]
(embryology)
An evolutionarily conserved developmental pathway utilized during the differentiation of a plethora of tissue types, in organisms as diverse as nematodes and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The secondary endpoints were overall survival and biomarkers, which were to reflect activation of the Notch pathway gene.
However, NRARP as a feedback regulator of Notch pathway would be activated by overexpressed Notch, exerting negative effect on the activation of the target genes of Notch, and attenuating antitumor effects accordingly.
These effects are due to an unexpected different wiring of the NOTCH pathway in BEC versus LEC.
The Notch pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling system that plays a crucial role in cell fate decisions, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis.
In the absence of Prkci, the Notch pathway produces a protein that signals to stem cells to make more stem cells.
As the Notch pathway, especially Notch-1 signaling, plays an important role in the determination of cell fate, its inhibition may provide a promising target for cancer therapy.
In their latest work, the investigators found that blocking the Notch pathway increases the formation of new hair cells not from remaining hair cells but from certain nearby supporting cells that express a protein called Lgr5.
10,13-15) In addition, 70 to 80% of Alagille Syndrome patients report mutations in the Jagged1 gene, which encodes a ligand belonging to the NOTCH pathway.
The scientists found that GSI-34, a drug that is a Notch pathway inhibitor under development for cancer treatment, was able to block the macrophages.
Novel compounds such as inhibitors of the sonic hedgehog or the Notch pathway are under clinical investigation.