Nova Scotia

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Nova Scotia

(nō`və skō`shə) [Lat.,=new Scotland], province (2001 pop. 908,007), 21,425 sq mi (55,491 sq km), E Canada.

Geography

One of the Maritime ProvincesMaritime Provinces
or Maritimes,
Canada, term applied to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, which before the formation of the Canadian confederation (1867) were politically distinct from Canada proper.
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, Nova Scotia comprises a mainland peninsula and, across the Canso Strait, the adjacent Cape Breton IslandCape Breton Island,
island (1991 pop. 161,686), 3,970 sq mi (10,282 sq km), forming the northeastern part of N.S., Canada, and separated from the mainland by the narrow Gut, or Strait, of Canso. The easternmost point is called Cape Breton.
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. It is bounded on the N by the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Northumberland Strait, across which lies Prince Edward Island; on the E and S by the Atlantic Ocean; and on the W by New Brunswick, from which it is largely separated by the Bay of Fundy but to which the Chignecto Isthmus connects it. The climate is moderate and rainfall abundant. The east coast is rocky, with numerous bays and coves, and is dotted with many charming fishing villages. Off the beautiful south shore is Sable Island, called the graveyard of the Atlantic for its many shipwrecks; on the west coast huge Fundy tides wash the shores, extending into the Minas Basin and the Annapolis River estuary.

Frequently visited historical sites include the Alexander Graham Bell Museum at Baddeck, the Shrine of Evangeline at Grand Pré, and the town of Annapolis RoyalAnnapolis Royal,
town (1991 pop. 633), W N.S., Canada, on the Annapolis River. Founded as Port Royal by the sieur de Monts in 1605, the settlement was destroyed (1613) by English colonists under Samuel Argall but was rebuilt by the French.
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, site of the first permanent Canadian settlement (Port-Royal, 1610). Cape Breton Island (est. 1936) and Kejimkujik (est. 1968) national parks are in Nova Scotia. Abundant game, all types of fishing, and some of the best sailing on the continent attract visitors. The capital and largest city is HalifaxHalifax,
city (1991 pop. 114,455), provincial capital, S central N.S., Canada, on the Atlantic Ocean. It is the largest city in the Maritime Provinces and is one of Canada's principal ice-free Atlantic ports.
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; other important cities are DartmouthDartmouth,
city (1991 pop. 67,798), S N.S., Canada, on Halifax harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. The city has large sugar and oil refineries, and it produces ships, iron, and aircraft parts.
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, SydneySydney,
city (1991 pop. 26,063), Cape Breton Island, N.S., Canada, on the northeast coast at the head of the South Arm of Sydney Harbour. It is the port and the commercial, trade, and industrial center in a former coal-mining area.
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, Glace BayGlace Bay
, town (1991 pop. 19,501), E Cape Breton Island, N.S., Canada. Exploitation of its coal mines began toward the end of the 19th cent., but declined in the 1960s; the last mine in the region closed in 2001.
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, TruroTruro
, town (1991 pop. 11,683), central N.S., Canada, near the head of Cobequid Bay, an arm of the Bay of Fundy. It is a railroad and industrial center, with lumber mills, printing plants, and other factories.
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, and New GlasgowNew Glasgow,
town (1991 pop. 4,134), N N.S., Canada, on East River. It is an industrial town located in a coal region. Steel products and machinery are manufactured, and there is a large pulp mill nearby.
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.

Economy and Higher Education

Mining has been historically critical to Nova Scotia. Coal was extracted principally in the Sydney–Glace Bay area of Cape Breton Island, but the mines closed in 2001. Gypsum, barite, and salt are mined. The decline of mining has increased the importance of fishing to Nova Scotia. Fleets operate on the continental shelf, especially on the Grand BanksGrand Banks,
submarine plateau rising from the continental shelf, c.36,000 sq mi (93,200 sq km), off SE Newfoundland, N.L., Canada. It is c.300 mi (480 km) long and c.400 mi (640 km) wide; depths range from 20 to 100 fathoms.
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, and farther out to sea, although years of overfishing have now led to serious cutbacks in production. Lobster, scallops, and haddock are the biggest catches. Offshore deposits of natural gas have begun to be exploited. Inland, the forests yield spruce lumber, and the province's industries produce much pulp and paper. In the northwest there is dairying, the most important sector of Nova Scotia's agricultural economy, and the region of Annapolis and Cornwallis contains valuable apple orchards. There are also significant hay, grain, fruit, and vegetable crops. The bay lowlands, reclaimed by dikes in the 17th cent., are very productive.

Manufacturing is the largest sector of Nova Scotia's economy. In addition to the iron and steel produced at Sydney, the province's manufactures include processed food (especially fish), automobiles, tires, sugar, and construction materials. In addition to its all-year port facilities, Halifax is a railroad terminus. There are both hydroelectric and tidal (at Annapolis Royal) power-generating plants. Coast, countryside, and historical sites attract tourists.

Educational institutions include Acadia Univ., at Wolfville; Dalhousie Univ., Mount St. Vincent Univ., St. Mary's Univ., the Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, and the Univ. of King's College, all at Halifax; Sainte-Anne Univ., at Church Point; St. Francis Xavier Univ., at Antigonish; and the Univ. College of Cape Breton, at Sydney.

History and Politics

Two Algonquian peoples, the Abnaki and the Micmac, inhabited the area before Europeans arrived. John Cabot may have landed (1497) on the tip of Cape Breton Island; European fishermen were already making regular stops during their yearly expeditions. An unsuccessful French settlement was made in 1605 at Port-Royal (now Annapolis Royal); in 1610 the French succeeded at the same site. For the next century and a half France and England bitterly contested rights to AcadiaAcadia
, Fr. Acadie, region and former French colony, E Canada, encompassing modern Nova Scotia but also New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and coastal areas of E Maine. After an abortive 1604 settlement of St.
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, which included present-day Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. In 1621, Sir William Alexander obtained a patent from James I for the colonization of Acadia. Control alternated between France and England through several wars and treaties.

Under the Peace of Utrecht (1713–14), the Nova Scotia peninsula was awarded to England, although Cape Breton Island was retained by the French. Hostilities were renewed in 1744. During the French and Indian War (1755–63), a tragic incident was the expulsion of the French Acadians—described by Longfellow in Evangeline. The Treaty of Paris (1763) gave nearly all of what remained of French North America to England. Prince Edward Island, joined to Nova Scotia in 1763, became separate in 1769. During this period Nova Scotia pioneered in Canadian history with the first newspaper (Halifax Gazette, 1752), the first printing press (1751), and the first university (King's College, Windsor, 1788–89).

With the influx (from 1783) of United Empire LoyalistsUnited Empire Loyalists,
in Canadian history, name applied to those settlers who, loyal to the British cause in the American Revolution, migrated from the Thirteen Colonies to Canada.
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 leaving the American colonies, lingering sentiment in favor of joining the new United States was overwhelmed, and New Brunswick and Cape Breton became (1784) separate colonies. Cape Breton rejoined Nova Scotia in 1820. During the early 19th cent. thousands of Scots and Irish arrived. Under Joseph Howe, Nova Scotia became the first colony to achieve (1848) responsible (or cabinet) government. It acceded to the Canadian confederation as one of four original members in 1867 after considerable difficulty over economic arrangements. Nova Scotia has recently struggled to stabilize an economy damaged by decline in the mining and steel industries. Federal programs have been undertaken to develop secondary industries and to locate offshore oil or natural-gas deposits, and natural-gas production in the Cape Sable area, with pipeline transport to New England, began in 2000.

Progressive Conservatives dominated politics from 1978 to 1993, when Liberal John Savage became premier. Savage was succeeded in 1997 by Liberal Russell MacLellan, but in 1999, Progressive Conservative John F. Hamm became premier. Hamm and his party were returned to power in 2003. Hamm retired in 2006 and was succeeded as premier by Rodney MacDonald. The Progressive Conservatives narrowly retained power in the 2006 elections. In 2009 voters elected the province's first New Democratic party government; Darrell Dexter became premier. The 2013 elections brought a Liberal government into office, headed by Stephen McNeil; four years later McNeil and the Liberals narrowly won again. The province sends 10 senators and 11 representatives to the national parliament.

Bibliography

See T. B. Akins, comp., Acadia and Nova Scotia (1869, repr. 1972); S. Hines, Nova Scotia: The Lighthouse and Annapolis Valley (1980); P. B. Waite, The Man from Halifax: Sir John Thompson Prime Minister (1986); N. MacKinnon, This Unfriendly Soil: The Loyalist Experience in Nova Scotia, 1783–91 (1989).

Nova Scotia

 

a province in southeastern Canada occupying the Nova Scotia peninsula and Cape Breton Island. Area, 54,600 sq km. Population, 789,000 (1971), primarily Anglo-Canadians. The capital is Halifax.

Nova Scotia is a relatively well-developed province economically. Fifty-seven percent of the population lives in cities, and 40 percent in fishing villages. Coal mines near Sydney produce 20 percent of Canada’s coal. Gypsum and approximately 90 percent of Canada’s barite are mined in Nova Scotia. Industries include ferrous metallurgy (centered in Sydney), oil refining, the byproduct coke industry, the production of transportation equipment (Halifax), food processing (primarily canned fish), the pulp and paper industry, and woodworking. Two heavy-water plants are located in Glace Bay and Point Tupper. A suburban type of farming exists and horticultural establishments produce apples for export. The province is a popular tourist area.

Nova Scotia’s indigenous population was made up of Algonquin Indians. In the early 17th century, the first settlements of Europeans appeared in the province—first French, and later English. As a result of a long war between the British and the French (Queen Anne’s War), Nova Scotia became a possession of Great Britain in 1713. It has been part of the Dominion of Canada since 1867.

REFERENCE

Campbell, G. G. The History of Nova Scotia. Toronto [1948].

Nova Scotia

 

a peninsula in southeastern Canada, part of the province of Nova Scotia. A narrow strait separates it on the north from Cape Breton Island. The peninsula is approximately 430 km long and up to 130 km wide. Composed of Paleozoic rocks (granites, gneisses, sandstones), it has a low relief with hilly ridges up to 150–240 m in elevation. There are traces of ancient glaciation. The climate is temperate and humid, with up to 1,200 mm of precipitation annually. The ridges are covered with coniferous forests mixed with some maple and birch. Deposits of barite, coal, and common salt are found on the peninsula.

Nova Scotia

1. a peninsula in E Canada, between the Gulf of St Lawrence and the Bay of Fundy
2. a province of E Canada, consisting of the Nova Scotia peninsula and Cape Breton Island: first settled by the French as Acadia. Capital: Halifax. Pop.: 936 960 (2004 est.). Area: 52 841 sq. km (20 402 sq. miles)
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Meanwhile, American producers and Nova Scotian crews were busy shooting the American movie of the week, The Elizabeth Smart Story, with Halifax standing in for--you guessed it-Salt Lake City.
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